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Summary of My Post-CPI Tweets (July 2022)

Below is a summary of my post-CPI tweets. You can (and should!) follow me @inflation_guy, but to get these tweets in real time on CPI morning you need to subscribe to @InflGuyPlus by going to the shop at https://inflationguy.blog/shop/ , where you can also subscribe to the Enduring Investments Quarterly Inflation Outlook. Sign up for email updates to my occasional articles here. Investors, issuers and risk managers with interests in this area be sure to stop by Enduring Investments! Get the Inflation Guy app in your app store! Check out the Inflation Guy podcast!

The tweets below have some deletions and redactions from what actually appeared on the private feed. But this is most of it.

  • It’s #CPI Day again. I know we all get excited about #inflation day. Or maybe it’s just me.
  • This month is special because we’re taking the CPI ‘broadcast’ private. Non-subscribers will get many – but not all – of these tweets in a summarized form, a couple of hours from now. But you get the whole shebang.
  • Here’s how this will go: I will give my usual walk-up. Then at 8:30ET, when the data drops, I’ll be pulling that in and will post a number of charts and numbers, in fairly rapid-fire succession.
  • Then I will start putting ‘replies’ to the charts with some remarks where necessary. At the same time, I’ll be running a live commentary on Zoom. (That live feed will go live just before 8:30).
  • Here is the zoom link, for subscribers only: <<REDACTED>>   You’ll be muted and cameras will be blocked as well, assuming I remember to do that. 🙂 But you can put questions in the chat (or on Twitter) if you like.
  • If you prefer the phone, you can get to the conference line at (518) 992-1112, access code <<REDACTED>>. I’ll be on both. I’ll look better on the phone.
  • I’ll also be tweeting some of the charts that are slower to generate and giving you my impressions on the fly. I think the whole post-CPI bit will take about 30 minutes, and my Zoom only goes 40 so that’s a pretty solid estimate!
  • After my comments on the number, I will post a partially-redacted summary at https://inflationguy.blog and later will podcast a summary at https://inflationguy.podbean.com . And all of that also will be linked on the Inflation Guy mobile app.
  • But of course, you get it first, and you get some things others won’t. Starting with my thanks for subscribing!
  • With that, let’s start the walk-up. Going into last month, we’d seen a dramatic collapse of breakevens: -210bps on the 1y, -70bps on the 5y, -50bps on the 10y. Some of this was the decline in energy, but not all. Implied core inflation also fell.
  • This month has seen a bit of a rationalization, and stability returning. Short breakevens still contracted because of gasoline, but longer inflation swaps/breakevens actually rose a smidge.
  • Since gasoline ‘caught up’ in a way, core inflation implied by swaps increased a bit. Right now, the curve implies 3.7% core CPI over the next year, 3.2% the year after that, then 2.95%, and so on. Actually, NOT pricing in that core will get back to the Fed’s target.
  • As an aside, to me this still looks low. There should be asymmetry to outcomes (5% higher inflation is more likely than 5% lower inflation) that implies these should have some option value and trade above our raw expectations for inflation’s path. Still, it’s not horrible.
  • Although I think the 3.7% for the next 1y DOES look quite low. We’re at 6%-ish right now on both core and median. It isn’t just one thing that needs to revert to some mythical mean. It’s the whole dang distribution. That seems challenging.
  • Especially since rents, both primary and OER, continue to surge. I’ll be honest: when I first sat down to think about this month’s CPI, I thought there was a chance for a small deceleration in rents, which jumped from 0.6% to 0.7% m/m on OER and slightly more on Primary Rents.
  • That was a big part of the upside surprise in core last month. But when I look at it…I’m not convinced that was necessarily an outlier. Yes, rents will eventually decelerate. But not yet I think. The chart here is census for asking rents and Reis for effective.
  • The gap between them came about during the eviction moratorium. I thought it would close. But asking rents are moving higher, not converging back. (Some other private surveys suggest asking rents may sag, but it seems speculative at the moment).
  • There’s another reason I’m concerned about rents, and I’ll talk about it on Zoom after the number when I’m working through the charts.
  • For this number today, the consensus is for 0.5% on core and 0.2% on headline because of the decline in gasoline. The OTC market has core around 0.54% and economists are at 0.49%, basically; they both round to 0.5% but the market is more bullish.
  • I’ve mentioned why I don’t think the downside risks from rents will necessarily materialize. But there are a couple of other downside risks.
  • Airfares, which is essentially energy services because it tracks jet fuel (see chart), will very likely decline this month. Some of this is seasonal, though – I adjust for that in the chart – which means that raw airfares could fall and not bring down airfare CPI.
  • Used cars seems overextended too and I’ve been expecting a correction there. The Black Book index Jan-June was -2% vs CPI for Used Cars +3%. FWIW, the Black Book index was down this month. So that’s another potential drag.
  • But…all of that sort of seems to be ‘in the price’ as they say. The last 3 core CPIs were 0.57%, 0.63%, and 0.71%, and the consensus this month is around 0.5%. So some of that is in the pudding already. I don’t know that I’m short at 0.5%.
  • Reaction function? Well, a strong core…I think even an 0.6% may qualify…is going to be rough on stocks and bonds. Another 0.7% and you’ll hear talk about an intermeeting move (I don’t think that’s likely).
  • Softer core, 0.4% print, will be initially taken well by the market. But be careful about jumping in. If we get an 0.3% or lower and the market rallies, sell into it because most likely there is a one-off that is pushing it lower. Watch the real-time Median I produce, to tell.
  • The market’s currently pricing in lots of good news, which is why I’d be leery about riding a pop higher. After all, the next 2 core readings to roll out of the y/y will be 0.18% & 0.26%…core will keep rising, so Fed heads are safe to react hawkishly to a modest core surprise.
  • That’s all for the walkup. I have to go refresh my coffee and turn on the conference line and zoom. Good luck and thanks again for subscribing.

  • 0.313% on core…definitely a surprise and we have to see why.
  • m/m CPI: -0.0193%   m/m Core CPI: 0.313%
  • Last 12 core CPI figures
  • M/M, Y/Y, and prior Y/Y for 8 major subgroups
  • Here is my early and automated guess at Median CPI for this month: 0.53%
  • Core Goods: 6.98% y/y Core Services: 5.54% y/y
  • Primary Rents: 6.31% y/y OER: 5.83% y/y
  • Further: Primary Rents 0.7% M/M, 6.31% Y/Y (5.78% last) OER 0.63% M/M, 5.83% Y/Y (5.48% last) Lodging Away From Home -2.7% M/M, 1.2% Y/Y (10.1% last)
  • Primary rents were 0.78% m/m last month, so the 0.7% was a modest deceleration but not exciting. OER was 0.70% last month so also a deceleration.
  • Some ‘COVID’ Categories:
    • Airfares -7.83% M/M (-1.82% Last)
    • Lodging Away from Home -2.74% M/M (-2.82% Last)      
    • Used Cars/Trucks -0.41% M/M (1.61% Last)       
    • New Cars/Trucks 0.62% M/M (0.65% Last)
  • The big story for ‘why the tail’ in core comes mostly from here, and maybe a bit in apparel (down on the month). An 8% drop in airfares is a big deal. Lodging Away from Home. And Used Cars wasn’t really a surprise, as I mentioned in my walkup.
  • Used cars could have been down more. I expected a decline, but there was room for more underperformance than that.
  • Piece 1: Food & Energy: 18.5% y/y  
  • Piece 2: Core Commodities: 6.98% y/y
  • Core commodities is where we find Used Cars and Apparel. New cars was still strong. We knew that as supply chain constraints cleared, this would moderate.
  • Piece 3: Core Services less Rent of Shelter: 5.26% y/y
  • Medical care was +0.44% m/m after 0.95% last month. Pharma +0.58% (0.38% last month). Doctors’ Services +0.27%, hospital services +0.49%.
  • Piece 4: Rent of Shelter: 5.76% y/y
  • Core ex-housing 6.04%, which is down from 7.6% in Feb, and dragged down by the same stuff the overall core was. But still pretty high.
  • a little surprised stocks holding as much onto their gains…this was soft for some really obvious reasons. It’s good news for the Fed but not GREAT. I guess it does take 75bps off the table probably.
  • It’s not time for a victory lap but I guess it does help to remove the sense of panic.
  • We’re still going to get higher core over the next couple of comps are easy and since the central tendency of this distribution is still strong, there’s no reason to think we’re going to keep getting 0s on core.
  • Checking my Median CPI. The median category as I said was Midwest OER, and since I manually seasonally adjust the OERs I could be a bit off. But looks like it will still be somewhere between 0.52 and 0.57 m/m…so again, no crash in the broad distribution.
  • Car and truck rental was also really weak, although a very small weight. Public Transportation, Lodging AFH, Misc Personal Goods, and on the Apparel side Infants/Toddlers and Men’s/Boys were all negative m/m.
  • Communication was also -0.33% m/m. Internet Services and electronic information providers was -0.81% m/m. That’s 1% of CPI, so that’s about 1bp of the core miss right there.
  • Also weak were various furnishings categories. Major appliances were -1.8% NSA m/m. Indoor plants and flowers…which has about the same weight as major appliances – check your understanding by answering why…were -1.2% NSA m/m.
  • “Other Furniture” was -4.3%! Other linens -1.8%. These are all NSA m/m figures. And this is where the supply chain squeeze lessening is going to show.
  • Here is major appliances PRICE LEVEL. Yes, they’re down, but they’re not going all the way back. The price level is permanently higher. What remains to be seen is how much of this is permanent and how much is ‘transitory’ due to supply constraints.
  • Same message from apparel – seasonally we tend to get a decline in July but this was larger than the normal seasonal which is why apparel was down m/m. And we import almost all apparel.
  • The message from the people who say inflation will go back down with recession is that unintended inventory accumulation is going to cause retailers to cut prices. Apparel is where you expect to see that first, because the seasons change quickly.
  • Here is the distribution of the CPI weights. There is more weight in the left tail, and that’s why core declined. But it’s REALLY in many cases that the weight in the left tail moved further left.
  • And here’s why I make that statement: the weight of categories inflating above 5% y/y went down only a tiny bit. So this is a left-tail event…which again is what median inflation is telling us.
  • The ongoing question is, “have inflation pressures peaked?” and “are we now in a disinflationary mode?” On the former, it’s too early to say but median at 0.53% rather than 0.7% is at least hopeful.
  • On the latter question, also too early BUT one small positive sign is that core inflation moved below median. It’s just one month, but remember: inflationary environments tend to have long upper tails (core>median), and v.v.. So watch this.
  • Median is going to get to about 6.27% y/y this month. And when the Quarterly Inflation Outlook comes out in a couple of days, you’ll see (if you are a client, or subscribe to it) that the midpoint of our 2022 median CPI forecasts have been moved WAY up to 6.3%. And 5.2% for 2023.
  • I think this is the last chart. The Enduring Investments Inflation Diffusion Index remains very high, no real sign of retracement yet.
  • So wrapping up. Stocks at this hour remain ebullient, while bonds have retraced some of the initial spike. It makes sense to reduce the probability of 75bps at the next FOMC meeting, even though this was mostly a left-tail event. >>
  • To be sure, I think the Fed still needs to reduce its balance sheet an awful lot, but if it just levels off then the price level will eventually converge to the rise in money growth. There’s a lot more to go there, though, which is why we’re not going back to 2% core soon.
  • So, I understand why stocks are excited. But I would be loathe to jump aboard unless the S&P can get above 4200 decisively and/or stay there for a few days. There’s a lot of optimism priced in. And CPI was nice…but the IMPORTANT parts aren’t yet “good news.”
  • In any event, thanks very much for subscribing and if you have any feedback, please write me at <<REDACTED>> and let me know! Have a good day.

Stocks at this hour continue to celebrate, and not entirely without reason. The Fed is much less likely to tighten by 75bps this month than they were before the number. However, we have some doves scheduled to speak today (Evans and Kashkari) so be attentive and if they’re still talking about 75bps, and keeping in mind there’s one more CPI print before the next FOMC meeting – it’s a sign that they really are focused on the bigger picture.

And the bigger picture is this: the economy is headed into a recession, but the signs on that will be unclear and/or people will be able to explain the signs away for a while. Meanwhile, inflation remains high and sticky, despite today’s number. I’m pleased that median CPI, which  exploded to 0.7% m/m in June, was back down to “only” 0.53% or so in July. But that’s still a 6.4% rate, and looking over the last several months you certainly can’t say there are any signs that inflation pressure is lessening or narrowing. At best, leveling off…and it’s even too early to be sure about that, given the continued acceleration in rents.

A year ago, I would have said that the Fed will take advantage of the weaker inflation data to back off of tightening some. But the Fed has been far more hawkish than I expected, and if they really do want to “get ahead” of inflation then they need to do it sooner rather than later since once core inflation starts to drop because of base effects, and the employment situation starts to weaken, there will be much more resistance to 75bp hikes. If Unemployment is at 5% and rising, they will not be hiking 75bps per meeting, no matter where inflation is.

So I’d repeat my admonition above – be careful jumping on board this equity rally. If stocks can sustain above 4200, then I have to reluctantly go along with the momentum. But I’d be careful about being too excited about inflation just because airfares dropped 8% this month.

Categories: CPI, Tweet Summary

Summary of My Post-CPI Tweets (June 2022)

Below is a summary of my post-CPI tweets. You can (and should!) follow me @inflation_guy. Or, sign up for email updates to my occasional articles here. Investors, issuers and risk managers with interests in this area be sure to stop by Enduring Investments! Get the Inflation Guy app in your app store! Check out the Inflation Guy podcast!

  • Here we go again. It’s #CPI Day. #inflation
  • Before I get started with the walkup: after my comments on the number, I will post a summary at https://mikeashton.wordpress.com and later it will be podcasted at https://inflationguy.podbean.com . And all of that also will be linked on the Inflation Guy mobile app.
  • What sets apart this month from many over the last couple of years are two things.
  • First, economists are now fully in the inflation-liftoff camp, with forecasts that are starting to look more like the actual data. The consensus for Core CPI is 0.54%. The average core CPI for the last 8 months is…0.54%! Who says that Econ PhD isn’t worth the money.
  • Second, and more significantly: the market has completely erased the possibility of sticky inflation and reflects 100% confidence that the Fed will be immediately and dramatically successful in restraining inflation.
  • The interbank market is pricing in 1.2% headline CPI for this month, but a SUM of 0.3% for the next 3 months. Even if gasoline, which has recently plunged from $5/gallon to $4.66/gallon, goes to $3.50 and stays there, this implies core CPI immediately decelerating.
  • The decline in the inflation markets has been unprecedented. 1y CPI swaps have fallen more than 200bps over the last month. The real yield on the July-2023 TIPS as risen 220bps during that time. 10y breakevens are narrower by 47bps.
  • The 1y inflation swap of 3.75%, considering that core and median inflation – which move slowly – are currently rising at a 6%-7% rate, implies a massive collapse in core prices and/or gasoline.
  • And this is important to note: there is as yet almost zero sign of that. Could it happen? Sure. But the Fed just made a massive 7% screw-up on inflation. My confidence that they know exactly how to get it back to 2% is…low. And to do so quickly? Very low.
  • I mentioned earlier the consensus for core CPI is +0.54%, which would put y/y at 5.7%. The consensus for headline is +1.1% (interbank market is at 1.2%), putting y/y headline at 8.8% or 8.9%.
  • I don’t do monthly forecasts because I want you to respect me in the morning. But I will say that the SPREAD between core and headline this month seems very wide to me. Typically core vs headline is a function of gasoline prices in a pretty simple way (see chart).
  • Given where the monthlies have been trending, I think core could be a little higher than consensus and headline a little lower. But if headline surprises to the upside, I suspect that will be because core did also.
  • Rents will continue to be strong. Last month, primary rents and OER rose at >7% annualized pace, and that didn’t seem too out-of-whack. Used Cars will likely be close to flat, and we could get a drag from airfares (?). So I would shade the core forecast on the high side.
  • But unless core is a lot higher than that, 1.1% or 1.2% m/m seems a stretch.
  • Used Cars will likely be close to flat, and we could get a drag from airfares (?). So I would shade the core forecast on the high side, but I’m not hugely confident in that.
  • Later you will see a lot of headlines about that new high in y/y CPI, but core CPI will continue to slide from its recent high at 6.47% in March. But after this month, Core CPI has easy comps for the next 3 months. If we keep printing 0.5%, we’ll get a new high in September.
  • Like I said, that’s contrary to the market’s pricing at the moment.
  • As a reminder, I tend to focus on Median CPI partly for this reason – outliers in core can pollute interpretation. And the Median CPI y/y chart is unambiguous at this point: still accelerating. In fact, the m/m Median CPI is looking even more disturbing than this y/y version.
  • Which brings me to an announcement of sorts. I do all of these charts more or less manually from big spreadsheets. But this month I am trying something new with my Median estimate (the Cleveland Fed reports Median CPI around lunchtime).
  • This month I’m trying an experiment with that figure. It’s going to be produced automatically when the CPI data drops, within about 1 minute (fingers crossed). And tweeted automatically. Does that make me a bot??! If it works, I may do others of my charts.
  • The actual core and headline m/m changes will also be bot-tweeted. I hope.
  • Anyway – market reaction to this number will be very interesting. If CPI is higher than expected, I would anticipate a very negative reaction to stocks and bonds, and v.v. People will start talking about 100bps of tightening this month (I doubt we will get that though).
  • And if CPI is soft, we should get a positive reaction from nominal stocks and bonds…naturally.
  • But what of inflation markets? Traditionally, an upside surprise would be met by a rally in breakevens. However, if investors really believe the Fed is going to respond aggressively and sucessfully, with a chance of overdoing it, then breakevens may FALL with a high surprise.
  • I don’t think that would make sense, but it also doesn’t make sense for 5y breakevens to be at 2.52% with median CPI at 5.5% and rising, wages at 6.1% and rising, and rents at 5.1% and rising.
  • However, markets clear risk; they don’t forecast. The inflation markets are telling us that people believe they have far more exposure to declining prices than to rising prices, and so need to sell it. That seems nonsensical to me, but ::shrug::.
  • So it will be interesting to look at the reaction in breakevens, especially if it seems nonobvious with the number.
  • That’s all for now. Number coming up. Good luck.

  • well…the consensus got the spread right, if not the level!
  • m/m CPI: 1.32% m/m Core CPI: 0.706%
  • Here is my early and automated guess at Median CPI for this month: 0.731%
  • Hey, that worked.
  • So, Owners’ Equivalent Rent was +0.7% m/m; Primary Rents +0.78% m/m. Rents will eventually decelerate, although not decline, but this will take a while.
  • Largely as a result of rents, core services rose to 5.5% y/y; core goods fell to 7.2% y/y. Not actually good news, since services are stickier.
  • So airfares fell, -1.82% m/m after a 12.5% surge last month. Lodging away from home -2.82% m/m. Car and truck rental -2.2% m/m. But Used Cars and Trucks +1.6%; New cars and trucks +0.7%.
  • Baby food +1.1% (NSA), and 12.6% y/y. But the main plant that had been shutdown is reopening. So, we got that going for us.
  • With y/y core falling to only 5.9%, it makes it even clearer that we will hit new highs in September if not before. Especially with core services continuing to rise, the m/m figures just aren’t going to drop that fast. And the comps for the next 3 months are +0.31, +0.18, +0.26.
  • I kinda buried the lede that headline CPI rose to 9.06% y/y. However, that is going to be the high for a little while unless energy sharply and quickly reverses.
  • Babysitting the bot got me off my game a little. Forgot to post this chart of the last 12 core CPIs.
  • So, this was not the highest core CPI we have seen. We had bigger ones back in 2021. But those were driven by outliers – you know that because median CPI did NOT have those spikes. This 0.7% is much worse…it’s not from outliers.
  • In the major groups, Apparel was +0.79% m/m. medical Care was +0.67% m/m. “Other” was +0.47%. The rise in medical was broad, with Pharma (+0.38% m/m), Doctors’ Services (+0.12%), and Hospital Services (+0.26%) all contributing. Still lower than core CPI, but trending higher.
  • Core CPI ex-shelter did decline, though, to 6.1% from 6.4%. That’s good I guess?
  • 10y BEI +7bps. So remember I was concerned that an upside surprise could be met with LOWER breaks if investors really believe the Fed is in charge and is gonna go large. Well, they may go large (stocks getting killed), but inflation folks less sure they are “in charge.”
  • The median category looks to be Medical Care Services. And that bot chart actually matches my spreadsheet. It was just truncated until I clicked on it. Man, this looks ugly.
  • That would put median CPI at 5.952%, rounding up to 6%, y/y. Another record high.
  • Biggest increases in core categories were Motor Vehicle Maintenance and Repair (+27% annualized) and Motor Vehicle Insurance (+26%), both a function of rising parts and replacement costs. Used Cars/Trucks +21%. Footwear +21%. Jewelry +19%. Infants’ apparel +16%.
  • In median, the Cleveland Fed splits OER into four geographic categories. This month, “South Urban” OER was up at roughly 12.5% annualized (roughly, because I seasonally adjusted it differently than the Cleveland Fed does).
  • Biggest monthly decliners were lodging away from home -29% annualized; -23% car and truck rental. Public Transp -5%, Misc Personal Goods -4%.
  • OER at 5.5% is well above my combo model. But it’s actually a little below one component of the model, which is based on incomes. 6.1% annualized income growth means the REAL rent growth isn’t as big as it looks.
  • This is a disturbing chart. It shows Atl Fed wages minus median CPI. I’ve estimated the last point (Wages could still accelerate this month, but won’t as much as Median). For a while, the median wage was steadily ahead of inflation. No longer. That’s why cons confidence is weak.
  • Let’s do four-pieces. Piece 1. Food & energy up more than 20% over the last year. That’s the highest in many, many years. And it’s why Powell is suddenly interested in headline.
  • Piece 2: Core goods. Yay! This is the story they were all sellin’ back when we first started spiking. “Once the ports clear, inflation will collapse back.” Actually, they told ya that PRICES would collapse. That is not ever going to happen. But inflation in core goods will slow.
  • Part of the reason core goods inflation will slow is because of the persistent strength in the dollar. I don’t know that will last forever, but while it happens it will tend to pressure core goods inflation lower.
  • Piece 3, core services less rent of shelter. This is the scariest one IMO, because it has been in secular disinflation for a long long time.
  • Piece 4, rent of shelter. This is also a candidate for scariest. People keep telling me home prices and rents will collapse but there’s a massive shortage of housing and building is difficult. Real prices could fall and nominal prices still rise, and that’s what I expect. Later.
  • So, this is fun. I have run this in the past but had to shift the whole thing because most of the distribution was off the right side. So the left bar shows the sum of categories inflating less than the Fed’s 2% target. The right bar is the weight of categories inflating >10%.
  • The sum of the weights of categories inflating faster than 5% is now over 70%. This was essentially zero pre-Covid.
  • Well, I guess we can wrap this up with a look at the markets. S&P futures -60 just before the open. 10y yields +5bps. 2y yields +12bps. 10y breakevens +5bps. Actually less-severe than I’d have expected. This is an ugly number.
  • So, we keep being told tales that inflation is peaking. And it will. Surely it will. It’s just that there are things that are still going up.
  • Our problem is that we have trained our perception on a low-inflation world. When prices go up 10%, we expect them to fall back. That isn’t automatic in an inflationary world. Prices going up too fast are followed by prices still going up, but a little slower.
  • There is most definitely a wage-price feedback loop going on. The black line below is going to get to about 6% today. The red line – which is a better measure than avg hourly earnings – is not likely to fall under that pressure.
  • We are still in an inflationary world. We are still in an accelerating-inflation world. It won’t last forever. But it isn’t over yet.
  • That’s all for now. Remember to visit https://mikeashton.wordpress.com to get the tweet summary later. Try the free Inflation Guy mobile app to get lots of inflation content. Check out the Inflation Guy podcast. https://inflationguy.podbean.com Like, click, retweet, etc. Thanks for tuning in!

Okay, to be sure I have long been in the camp that inflation would go higher, and remain stickier, than most people thought. The early spikes in inflation, due to used cars, were to me a harbinger and not a one-off. This is not, and never has been, primarily a supply-side problem. Today’s inflation did not start on the supply-side. The shortages were caused by a sudden resurgence in demand, and that demand was entirely artificial. It was that demand that created the shortages. To call this a ‘supply side problem’ is either ignorant or disingenuous. In some rare cases, supply was permanently impaired. Refinery capacity, for example. But in most cases, it wasn’t. Real GDP is back on trend.

So then surely we can get inflation back down by destroying demand? No – that’s not how it works. If you destroy demand you will also destroy supply…because that’s how you destroy demand, by getting people laid off. Hiking interest rates will eventually do that – hurt demand and production, but not necessarily do anything to inflation.

To get demand down without destroying supply, you need to run the movie in reverse. You’d need to suck away excess money from the system. That’s not going to happen, of course; it’s easier to do a helicopter-drop than a helicopter-suck. At best, we can hope that money supply flattens out, and recently it has started to look like that’s happening. That would mean that inflation would continue until a new price level consistent with the new quantity-of-money level had been achieved. This is what we can hope – that even though the Fed isn’t draining marginal reserves, somehow money growth slows because demand for loans evaporates even though banks remains eager to lend.  

It might happen, but since we’ve never tightened policy in this way – rates only, not reserve restraint – we don’t really know how, how much, or if it will work. In the meantime, inflation continues to surprise us in a bad way.

The topic for the next couple of weeks is going to be whether the Fed decides to hike 100bps, as the Bank of Canada just did in a surprise move. The market had priced in 75bps, and then a deceleration. I expect they will not, although we need to be defensive against the same leaks-to-the-big-guys that happened last meeting. While the inflation numbers continue to be ugly, and employment has not yet rolled over in a big way, inflation expectations have collapsed. To a Fed that depends very much on the idea of anchored inflation expectations, those markets are saying “okay Fed, you win. Inflation is dead. Your current plan is sufficient.”

That’s not my view, of course. In my view, if you keep using the paddles and the patient doesn’t respond you either need to code him, or you need to find a different treatment. I rather think, though, that the FOMC will say “inflation lags monetary policy by 12-18 months, so we just haven’t seen our effect yet.” Then again, so far I have been completely wrong about the Fed’s determination to hike rates (to be fair, they haven’t yet been tested by a sloppy market decline or a rise in unemployment, but I didn’t think they’d even do this much so I am willing to score that as -1 for the Inflation Guy.)

What to do? With inflation markets fully pricing a return to the old status quo, and that right quickly, it would seem to be fairly low-risk to be betting that we don’t get there so quickly. It would be hard to lose big by buying short breakevens in the 3s, when it’s currently printing in the 9s. Possible, but I like that bet especially since it carries well. And since real yields have risen so much, and the inflation-adjusted price of gold has fallen so much, I’m even starting to like gold for the first time in years. I’m not nutty about it, but it’s starting to look reasonable. It has been a rough couple of months for just about every investment out there (except real estate!), but opportunities are coming back.

Summary of My Post-CPI Tweets (May 2022)

June 10, 2022 2 comments

Below is a summary of my post-CPI tweets. You can (and should!) follow me @inflation_guy. Or, sign up for email updates to my occasional articles here. Investors, issuers and risk managers with interests in this area be sure to stop by Enduring Investments! Get the Inflation Guy app in your app store! Check out the Inflation Guy podcast!

  • It’s #CPI Day and, possibly, mea culpa day.
  • Last month I, & most everyone else, said the CPI peak was behind us as it dropped from 8.5% to 8.3%. In fact, I went out of my way to be sure people understand that peak CPI doesn’t mean peak PRICES (see my podcast at https://inflationguy.podbean.com/e/ep-28-this-month-s-cpi-report-peak-changes-not-peak-prices/ , e.g.)
  • We may have been premature. Today, while the consensus estimate is that headline will print 8.3% y/y the interbank market is exchanging that risk at 8.48%. And moreover, prices in the interbank market have the best guesses for headline CPI above 8.6% until October.
  • Of course that is because gasoline prices did NOT peak and kept on climbing. The national average is about to surpass $5/gallon. And this is keeping headline inflation bid.
  • Core CPI is still very likely to decline y/y. Consensus for the m/m is 0.5%, and the comp from May 2021 is +0.75%, so core should drop. The m/m consensus seems a little low, but 6 of the last 7 core prints have been between +0.5% and +0.6% so we are probably talking shading.
  • And I focus on Median CPI, which is still rising. It will keep going up for at least a few more months. And this is the salient point. Median is the best measure of the main thrust of the distribution – and while it’s rising, you can’t say price pressures have peaked yet.
  • Before I go on: after my comments on the number, I will post a summary at https://mikeashton.wordpress.com and later it will be podcasted at https://inflationguy.podbean.com . And all of that also will be linked on the Inflation Guy mobile app.
  • In the bad news category this month, new cars and apparel are likely to continue to be contributors. Used cars are a little less clear. But these are three of the big “core goods”. So it isn’t just used cars. It was never just used cars, of course. That was just a foil.
  • Also in the bad news category for the general inflation outlook (although not for this month’s CPI perhaps) is that wages are still accelerating. The Atlanta Fed Wage Growth Tracker is now up at 6.1% y/y.
  • The good news is those wages are maintaining a steady spread over median CPI. Bad news is that so far gasoline and food aren’t mean-reverting and so the wage slaves of the world (and that’s most of us) are still getting killed. But maybe apres le deluge things will be better.
  • Hey, more good news is that M2 is decelerating. It’s down to 8% y/y, and only 1-2% over the last 3 months. Problem is that prices still haven’t caught up with the money growth SO FAR, but at least maybe we’re stopping the digging of the hole. Early to say that yet.
  • Unfortunately, commercial bank credit is growing at 9.5% y/y. Which is exactly what you would expect when non-reserve-constrained banks are able to lend at higher market rates.
  • This is one of the mechanisms for velocity rising when rates go up: the supply of credit gets better, and the demand for credit is fairly inelastic (50bps means more to your bank than it does to you).
  • We have never ever tried to restrain inflation with rates alone. Repeat that to yourself: monetary policymakers have NEVER tried to restrain inflation anything like this level with just interest rates. In the past, they restricted reserves. Not this time. So, here’s hoping.
  • Pretty short walk-up today but that’s because all the stories are the same: rents, and breadth, and we are still looking for a peak. Rents still look strong, breadth is still wide, and the peak in headline and median appears to still be ahead.
  • Question to ponder is: if CPI hits a new high, how bad for equities is that? If inflation stays at 6% for 2022, how long can the Fed sell the idea that 2.75% is the highest they’ll need to hike? The Eurodollar curve doesn’t believe it, but it also thinks this is all over in 2023.
  • I’m still thinking the Fed will pause the first time stocks get sloppy or unemployment starts to rise, but maybe I’m wrong. So far no signs of that. Still, they’ve not been tested yet.
  • OK, number in a few. Good luck.

  • ok, well…I guess we weren’t at peak CPI yet. M/M headline +1%; Y/Y up to 8.6%. Core slipped, but not as far as expected. To 6.01%. The decline is base effects. Bad news is that this is the HIGHEST m/m core CPI since last June.
  • It wasn’t just gasoline helping the headline to new highs; Food & Beverages was +1.13% m/m, now up to +9.73% y/y. Again, that hurts the wage earners most.
  • Used Cars was +1.8% m/m. New cars +0.96% m/m. Airfares, after +19% last month, were +12.6% this month. And can I say, the quality of air travel is as bad as I can remember it, speaking anecdotally.
  • Remember how everyone said that when core goods inflation came down, this would pass? Well, it is! core goods fell to 8.5% y/y from 9.7%. But core services jumped to 5.2% from 4.9%.
  • Owners’ Equivalent Rent leapt +0.6% m/m and now at 5.1% y/y. Primary Rents +0.63%. I have to look back and see the last time we saw any m/m jump that big. Lodging Away From Home +0.9%. So Housing subcategory was +0.85% m/m, +6.9% y/y.
  • That was the biggest m/m change in OER since 1990. And it doesn’t look like it’s rolling over.
  • Doctors’ Services fell -0.14% m/m, and are at only +1.1% y/y. Amazing. Hospital Services +0.46% m/m, so y/y went to 3.87%. Overall Medical Care subcategory was +0.4% m/m, to 3.74% y/y.
  • Core inflation ex-housing declined to 6.4% y/y. Yay!
  • This is kind of what I was afraid of. Housing inflation is moving above our model. It’s more in line with one of the subcomponents of the model, which is income-driven. And since wage income is still rising rapidly, there’s no reason to expect rents to slow very much.
  • More good news is that alcoholic beverages inflation is only +4.04% y/y. We’re gonna need it.
  • Household energy was +3.96% m/m. Fuel Oil +11% on the month, +76% y/y. Piped gas +7.8% m/m, +30.2% y/y. Electricity +1.9% m/m, +12% y/y. Break out those sweaters.
  • (That was an allusion to Jimmy Carter telling folks to turn down the thermostat and wear a sweater, in the 1970s energy crisis).
  • So Communication was -3.5% on the month. No idea what that is all about. Misc Personal Services was -1.3% m/m. Tenants and Household Insurance -0.8% m/m. Without that 5% of the basket declining, this would have been WORSE.
  • Median also looks like it should be 0.63% m/m or so. If true, that would be the biggest median since 1982. And folks…pressures aren’t ebbing; they’re BUILDING. Core highest in a year (m/m); median highest in decades.
  • About 8% of the consumption basket inflated faster than 9% annualized this month (m/m * 12, not y/y). That’s ridiculous. Normally there are a handful of outliers.
  • Four Pieces charts. Food and Energy, no surprises.
  • Piece 2, core goods. Like I said, good news. Dollar strength doesn’t hurt, but this ebbing is mostly due probably to declining trucking/shipping. Still not exactly soothing.
  • Piece 3 is core services less rent of shelter. Highest in a very long time. Over the last few years, this has persistently been the one spot that was showing gradual disinflation. No more.
  • Piece 4 rent of shelter – I’ve already discussed. It’s taking the top off my model.
  • As predicted, stocks not loving this. Short end of the Treasury curve also less than pleased.
  • I forgot: CPI for baby food unchanged on the month, +12.75% y/y.
  • One more chart and then I want to wrap up. The Enduring Investments Inflation Diffusion Index declined slightly this month, but still at a very high level. Those few weird negative categories might have rounded its edges a little. Nothing soothing though.
  • So, look. This was worse than even the pessimists were looking for. Housing accelerating to new levels, as a slow-moving category, is really, really bad news.
  • Headline inflation, thanks to continued rises in gasoline prices, may advance still further. Core inflation was down, and may be down again next month, but ONLY because of really rough comps. May-2021 (dropped off today) was +0.75%. June was +0.80%.
  • But then July, August, and September 2021, on core CPI, were +0.31%, 0.18%, and 0.26%. We’re going to shatter that. So core CPI probably doesn’t really peak until September…at best.
  • Meanwhile, Median CPI is still rising, months away from a peak also, and more importantly still setting new highs in m/m prints. That’s amazingly bad news.
  • We all know the Fed is behind the curve. And we know that their 2.75% terminal dot was based on the assumption that inflation would ebb to a level they think is the natural equilibrium around 2.25%.
  • That ain’t gonna happen. Now, that doesn’t mean they’ll hike rates to where they really need to be, but the choice between saving the nation from inflation on the one hand and saving the stock market on the other hand just got real.
  • Remember this chart. All of the models the Fed is using assume the canopener. They assume inflation is pulled by anchored expectations or some other potion to 2.25%. This is false.
  • Image
  • What am I saying? DEFEND YOUR MONEY. That’s all for today. You can catch this summary on https://mikeashton.wordpress.com later, and I’ll drop a podcast tonight. Stop by Enduring Investments if you feel so inclined. Thanks for tuning in.

Maybe we will look back on this day and say “that’s the day that everyone caught on that this inflation isn’t going to just gently fade away.” Every crisis has an inflection point where suddenly everyone realizes they’re on the wrong side of the boat – the day that our assumptions up to that point became plainly and obviously wrong. In the global financial crisis, the day that Lehman failed (without being merged into some other firm like Bear was) was the day when the last sleeping people woke up.

This isn’t quite so dramatic, but banks aren’t failing so it is what we have.

So, peak CPI isn’t yet behind us. Some of that is gasoline, of course. But the core CPI figures were also stronger-than-expected, and the strongest month in a year. Median CPI is still getting stronger every month, with new m/m records every month and y/y still rising. Rents are still accelerating. So not only are prices still rising, but inflationary pressures appear to still be rising even though in some cases (notably in core goods) there are some signs of improvement.

Those pressures should eventually ebb, if money supply growth remains flattish as it has over the last few months. But the price level has not yet caught up with prior increases in the money supply. Even after the microwave is turned off, the kernels in the popcorn bag still pop for a little while. That’s the best case at this point – that we are witnessing the final kernel pops.

Summary of My Post-CPI Tweets (April 2022)

Below is a summary of my post-CPI tweets. You can (and should!) follow me @inflation_guy. Or, sign up for email updates to my occasional articles here. Investors, issuers and risk managers with interests in this area be sure to stop by Enduring Investments! Get the Inflation Guy app in your app store! Check out the Inflation Guy podcast!

  • It’s #CPI day and #inflation has peaked! Yay!
  • Well, in a few minutes it will be official: peak CPI has passed. Of course, that’s entirely a mechanical fact due to the fact that core CPI in April, May, and June last year was +0.85%, +0.75%, and +0.80%, and it (probably) won’t be that high this year.
  • It certainly doesn’t mean inflation pressures themselves have peaked. In fact Median CPI, which is a better measure of the central tendency of inflation pressures, is almost certain to rise to new y/y highs today. But don’t let the facts get in the way of a party.
  • The bigger issue I think is that people confuse peak INFLATION, which is a rate of change, with peak PRICES. Prices aren’t going to fall, even if the inflation rate falls. (Some prices will fall, of course, but not generally). Price level is here to stay.
  • Before I go on: after my comments on the number, I will post a summary at https://mikeashton.wordpress.com and later it will be podcasted at http://inflationguy.podbean.com . And all of that also will be linked on the Inflation Guy mobile app. AND….
  • What is more, at 1:00ET I will be live with @JackFarley96 on @Blockworks_ to talk (for a long time) about inflation. It’s on YouTube and free, so tune in! https://youtube.com/watch?v=mrG8IHXzlQU  And he had a nice placard made up.
  • Back to the report walk-up. The consensus for CPI is +0.2% m/m, dropping y/y to 8.1%. Gasoline should actually be a small drag this month, but contribute again next month. Consensus for core is +0.4%/6.0% after 6.5% y/y as of last month.
  • The interbank market isn’t so sanguine; it has been trading today’s headline print at a level suggesting 0.3%/8.2% for the headline number, so a snick higher than economists’ estimates.
  • That’s my feeling too. There’s more risk to the upside than the downside in this number today, I think.
  • The good news is that truckload rates are coming down, and this tends to precede ebbing in core. Not sure that effect is being felt yet; the typical lead is pretty long and manufacturers I speak to are still assuming high shipping in their pricing.
  • And the strong dollar will bring down core goods eventually too (it should decline today but is still double-digits). That is also a long lead. Used cars should drag slightly today. They were -3.8% m/m last month and private surveys have them a smidge lower this month.
  • But again, the rate of increase in used car prices is declining mostly because of base effects, not because prices themselves are going back to the old levels. And they won’t. We have 40% more money than we had 2y ago; that’s not consistent with prices where they were 2y ago.
  • On the other side of the coin, primary rents surprised on the low side last month. I expect a bit of a retracement higher this month, and I’m still not sure we’ve seen the peak m/m OER rate. Those are the 500-lb gorillas and until they ebb we won’t get 2% CPI.
  • As longtime followers know, I’ve also been watching Medical Care for a while. This month I actually saw stories about nurses’ salaries starting to pressure hospital prices higher. So still attentive to that. It’s one of the only sectors that hasn’t really participated.
  • We are also eventually going to get a bump higher in college tuition CPI – saw a story y’day about BU raising tuition ~5% (I put the story on the Inflation guy app). But the NSA series mostly puts those adjustments in the summer so we shouldn’t see an inflection yet.
  • In the markets, the past month has seen a massive shift in interest rates higher, and breakeven inflation rates lower (the breakeven reversal coming mostly over the last few days). 1y inflation swaps are -58bps on the month. Only some of that is carry.
  • Stocks have obviously been under pressure from rising inflation and real rates. Over the last couple of days, the stock market debacle has caused some unwinding of the rate selloff but breakevens are still on the back foot.
  • Stocks today seem chipper, but most of that is coming from signs of lower COVID transmission in Shanghai and a sense that lockdowns there may end soon. We will see if they’re still chipper after CPI.
  • I still don’t see the Fed as hawkish as what is priced in, mainly because I think they’ll lose their nerve as asset prices fall. I don’t really care about them changing the price of money. I’m watching for a change in quantity of money. So far, not impressed.
  • Just 4 minutes to the figure. Good luck!

  • Oh, snap.
  • Headline CPI fell to 8.3% y/y, not as far as expectations. Bigger deal is that core CPI was several ticks higher than expected. 0.57% m/m
  • I am scrunching up my eyes but I can’t see a decline in inflation pressures here.
  • Well, let’s see. Used Cars -0.38% m/m, small drag. New cars +1.14%, though. The spread Used:New needs to close but most of that spread probably will be new car prices coming up. After all, new price level as I said.
  • Owners’ Equivalent Rent 0.46% to 4.78% y/y from 4.54%. That’s in line with where it has been. But Primary Rents jumped back up after the surprise last month: 0.56% m/m to 4.82% y/y from 4.45% y/y.
  • COVID recovery continues: Lodging Away from Home +1.7% m/m; airfares +18.6%!
  • Now, I have been seeing a lot of stories about this one. It’s only 0.04% of the consumption basket but it really hits viscerally. Baby Food, +3.05% m/m, +12,9% y/y.
  • Food and Beverages as a whole, +0.84% m/m, +9.00% y/y. Ow!
  • Now, I don’t know if this is good news or not but core inflation EX HOUSING declined to 6.8% y/y from 7.5%. Good news is that means some of the outliers are coming back. Bad news is that means the big slow categories are carrying most of the upward momentum.
  • I guess looking at the chart, I probably shouldn’t get very excited about that last point.
  • Of note is that Apparel was -0.75% m/m. Apparel is only 2.5% of the basket these days (yet still a major subgroup), but it is Core Goods and one of the categories that you’d expect to see a dollar effect in. Core goods y/y dropped under 10%. But still a long ways to go.
  • …in that chart you can also see core services up to 4.9% y/y, which is the highest since 1991. So there’s part of the economy that’s not inflating at 40-year highs. And it’s not a small part of the economy. But, 5% isn’t exactly great news.
  • Turning to Medical Care – it was +0.44% m/m, up to 3.23% y/y. Led by Hospital Services, +0.48% m/m. Still not alarming and below the price pressures we’re seeing everywhere else. Weird.
  • Within food, here are some of the m/m NSA changes that people are seeing. This is why they’re yelling, Joe. Putin’s arm is long: Dairy +2.4% m/m. Meats poultry fish and eggs +1.7%. Cereals/bakery products +1%. Nonalcoholic beverages +1.4%.
  • Biggest losers in core (annualized monthly rate): Jewelry/Watches -19%, Footwear -15%, Women’s/Girls’ Apparel -10%.
  • Biggest winners in core (annualized monthly rate): Lodging away from home +23%, Motor Vehicle Parts and Equipment +15%, New Vehicles +15%, Car/Truck Rental +10%. Shorter list than we’ve seen in a while, anyway.
  • My guess at Median CPI is not good news: 0.53% m/m is my estimate, 5.23% y/y. That’s a better sense of where the inflation pressures are. We’ll revert to something like 4.5%-5% just on y/y effects, but until the monthly Median CPI is not hitting 0.5%, we’re not out of the woods.
  • There’s also this. I’d want to see core below median as a sign inflationary pressures are ebbing. In disinflationary environments tails are to the low side (so avg<median). In inflationary environment, tails to the upside (median<avg). We are still in inflationary world.
  • Quick check of them there markets…whoops, it appears equity investors don’t like this number.
  • By the way, for everyone thinking that rents have to stop going up because people can’t afford these levels. Again, the price level has changed. And wages are keeping up with rent increases, on average. There is no obvious sign to me that rents are overextended at all.
  • Here are the four-pieces charts, and I think we’re going to see the same story in the diffusion calculations. The stickier stuff is coming along for the ride. Here is piece 1, food and energy. No surprise here. And gasoline will be back as an addition next month.
  • Core goods. This is where the dollar effect, and the decline in the cost of shipping, will eventually be felt. And at some level actually is (see Apparel).
  • But now we get to core services less rent of shelter. This has been inert for years until just recently. This is the second-stickiest of the four pieces.
  • And rent of shelter. The stickiest. Rising, and not yet showing signs of slowing (although I think 5-6% is where it flattens out for a while). There’s just not a lot of great news here.
  • Tying up one loose end here – used cars was a small drag. But look at how the y/y plunged. Again, this is because even with little change in the PRICE LEVEL of used cars the rate of change will decline.
  • Couple of quick diffusion charts and then I’ll wrap up. Here is the proportion of the consumption basket that is inflating faster than 4%. It’s at 76% and actually just reached a new high. No sign of peak inflation here.
  • And finally, the Enduring Investments Inflation Diffusion Index…actually declined slightly. Last few months it has rocked back and forth a little bit at a very high level. No real sign of peak inflation here either.
  • Summing up. The peak y/y CPI print is now behind us, at least for now. Expect a victory lap from policymakers talking about how their policies are winning. But there’s no sign of peak inflation pressure yet.
  • The core and headline numbers actually fell less than expected. And let’s face it, this month’s Core CPI figure annualizes to almost 7%.
  • In fact, 6 of the last 7 core CPI numbers have been between 0.5% and 0.6%, which would annualize of course to 6%-7.2%. If that’s what we’re celebrating with “peak CPI” behind us, I guess I’ll bring the whiskey but I’m not sure I’m celebrating.
  • And FWIW, the “peak” is because we dropped off 0.86% (core m/m) from April 2021. We have 0.75% to drop next month, then 0.80%. But then we see 0.31%, 0.18%, and 0.25%. In other words, apres le deluge, more deluge.
  • Core CPI is likely to still be 5%-6% at year-end! The sticky categories are still accelerating, and there will be other long tails to the upside. That’s just what an inflationary environment looks like. Watch Median CPI, which will be lower but no less concerning.
  • Will the Fed keep hiking raising the price of money? Probably, although I think the swagger might leave them when stocks are another 20% lower.
  • Will the Fed actually decrease the QUANTITY of money, which is what matters? They can’t, because banks are not reserve-constrained any more. So it’s up to loan demand and supply, and recently loan demand has been increasing, not decreasing. Chart is source Fed, h/t DailyShot
  • Bottom line, folks, is that this might be a clearing in the woods but there’s a lot of woods ahead. Eventually inflation will ebb to 4%ish, but it will take time. I don’t see 2% for quite a long time, and not until interest rates are quite a bit higher.
  • Thanks for tuning in. Don’t forget to check the summary later on the blog https://mikeashton.wordpress.com , and http://inflationguy.podbean.com  where I’ll have a podcast on this later. AND tune in at 1:00ET for Inflation Guy live with@JackFarley96 on @Blockworks_

The theme of the day is that “peak inflation” means different things to different people. To economists, and policymakers, and Wall Street brokers trying to get you back into the meme stocks, “peak inflation” means “the year/year rate of inflation will decline from here.” We already knew that was happening, before this number ever showed up on screen. Yes, the drop was less than expected, but the peak is still there in March 2022!

“Peak inflation” means something different to the average consumer, who isn’t a trained economist. Consumers tend to conflate “inflation” with “high prices”, rather than rising prices. That is, they tend to confuse the level of prices with the rate of change. So the consumer hears “peak inflation is here!” and expects that prices themselves should go back to the old levels. To some extent, this version is reinforced by the price they see most often: gasoline, which goes up and down. But most prices do not go up and down. They go up more quickly, and they go up more slowly, and sometimes they stay the same. Most prices don’t go down. The average consumer, thinking he has just been promised that used car prices, meat prices, gasoline prices, and rents are going to go back down is going to be even more upset when that doesn’t happen. (This is why politicians ought to be very careful about talking about “peak inflation” as a good thing. To the average consumer, prices that go up more slowly is just less-bad than prices that go up quickly…and they think you’ve promised them something good.)

And the inflation specialist doesn’t mean either of these things when he/she says “peak inflation.” The inflation specialist is looking at pressures, and whether those pressures are increasing, abating, or staying the same. For now, those pressures are staying about the same, with m/m core and median CPI in basically the same range they have been in for 6 months. There is not yet any sign that those pressures are ebbing. Yes, they are ebbing in some items, such as in Used Cars, and in some goods where supply chains are clearing (at higher prices). In general, we would expect goods and services which have reached a new equilibrium price level to stop going up so fast. But those are just the goods and services that moved first. With 40% more money and an economy that’s only 5% or 10% bigger, we should expect prices to eventually rise about 30%. Some more, some less, of course, and if money velocity stays down forever then it will be 20% and not 30%. But this is the point. Peak inflation does not mean peak prices. Prices continue to rise at a rapid rate, and there is as yet no sign that the pressure to do so is ebbing.

Summary of My Post-CPI Tweets (March 2022)

Below is a summary of my post-CPI tweets. You can (and should!) follow me @inflation_guy. Or, sign up for email updates to my occasional articles here. Investors, issuers and risk managers with interests in this area be sure to stop by Enduring Investments! Get the Inflation Guy app in your app store! Check out the Inflation Guy podcast!

  • It’s #CPI #inflation day again, and a watershed one at that. If you had told me back at the beginning of my career in 1990 that we would see 8.5% inflation again, I would not have been surprised. If you had told me it would take 32 years, I would have been flabbergasted.
  • But, here we are. The consensus Bloomberg estimate is for 8.4% on headline inflation with 6.6% on core. That’s monthly of about 1.25% and 0.5% (!) But last month, the interbank market was looking at an 8.6% peak, so I guess that’s good. Energy has come off the boil some.
  • But this is the first number that is fully post-Ukraine-invasion so it will still get a big dollop of energy inflation.
  • Before I go on: after my comments on the number, I will post a summary at https://mikeashton.wordpress.com and later it will be podcasted at http://inflationguy.podbean.com . And all of that also will be linked on the Inflation Guy mobile app. Please stop by/tune in.
  • First, the good news. I expect today’s figures will mark the highs for the year. The comps get really hard hereafter: in April 2021, Core CPI rose 0.86% m/m, 0.75% in May, and 0.80% in June.
  • The bad news is that inflation might not ebb very far. The last 5 monthly core prints have been between 0.5% and 0.6%. The central tendency of the distribution appears to have moved up from 2-3% to maybe as high as 6%+.
  • That means that even when inflation is at an ebb, we’re looking at 3-4 ish, not 1ish. More good news though! The Fed in theory has total control of this. If it aggressively shrinks the balance sheet, then it can wring inflation out of the system.
  • I have no doubts that the Fed has the tools. There have been signs they aren’t focusing on the right ones. And there’s at least new vigor in the talk. But I am still skeptical that they are willing to break things.
  • By aggressively shrinking the balance sheet, I don’t mean $60bln a month; I mean taking the whole thing down to $2-4T in a reasonably short period of time.
  • But while it now looks like the FOMC will bull ahead with 50bps this month (surprising me), I just can’t bring myself to believe that it will crack the stock market and keep tightening through the recession we’ll get in late 2022/early 2023.
  • 275bps of rate hikes? Color me skeptical as soon as the growth data starts to flag a bit, or unemployment ticks up.
  • That’s really the longer-term question. Will the Fed do what it takes to break the cycle they put into motion, by reversing it? AND will they resist responding to the next recession with more of the same? I have my doubts. Would be happy to be wrong.
  • Wages, food, and rents have been booming. There is some feedback going on here. Of course, the main culprit continues to be the huge increase in the quantity of money over the last few years. The rest of it is micro.
  • But if you’re looking at supply chain issues – they haven’t gone away. In some cases they’re getting worse. As a reminder, though, that’s how inflation manifests, is in shortages of things that are over-demanded thanks to the money gusher. Prices adjust in response.
  • The bond market is starting to adjust to the realities of a hawkish Fed although not yet really putting rates at anything we would consider neutral (with a 10y rate around GDP+desired inflation, say 4-5% total).
  • Over the last month, inflation expectations have been broadly unchanged to slightly lower – although a lot of that is carry going away. Real rates are up 50-100bps, and nominal rates up 80-85bps. That’s big, but not nearly big enough to make a serious difference.
  • Why hasn’t the stock market begun to reflect the higher inflation? Partly because inflation expectations still haven’t firmly broken higher. And, after all, real rates are still slightly negative. But we’ll get there.
  • Now, in today’s number we will look aghast at the food category. High and persistent inflation in food and energy is not something policymakers can do a lot about, but it IS what leads to global political unrest…which leads to more supply chain problems and de-globalization.
  • Rents will remain high, currently trending towards 5-6% as Primary Rents continue to adjust post-eviction-moratorium.
  • And Owners’ Equivalent Rent remains high but steadier (at least recently). This is likely to remain so for the rest of 2022. Remember, the rent pieces are the big slow-moving pieces. Usually slow-moving, that is.
  • On the other side, I think there is a chance that Used Cars are a drag although prices themselves aren’t going to go back to the old levels. Might retrace a bit, but the new price level is higher – that’s what the money does. So rate of increase will decline. Level? Not so much.
  • But airfares and lodging away from home may be adds. Look as usual for the breadth; the odd stories will be the categories that did NOT rise.
  • I’m also still watching the Medical Care subgroup, as the inflation there has remained surprisingly tame through all of this. Only Medical Care and Education/Communication are below 2.5% y/y among the major categories! They’re due to participate eventually.
  • Here we go. Three minutes. Good luck. Take a picture to remember this by. At least until we get higher numbers in 3 years.

  • Pretty close. The headline number showed 8.5% y/y because the monthly number was just a little higher than expectations. But with all the volatility, that’s a great consensus estimate. Core was quite soft, at 0.32% m/m. Well, that’s soft these days.
  • Y/y core CPI therefore was only a snick or two higher, 6.44% y/y vs 6.42% y/y last month. As a reminder, hard comps are coming up so that probably marks the highs in both headline and core. Question is how far and how fast they drop.
  • That was the lowest core CPI figure since the three soft ones of July/Aug/Sep last year. We’ll look at the components.
  • A big culprit was, as I thought it might be, Used Cars. The private surveys had had a decent drop recently; in the CPI they were -3.8% m/m so that the y/y is “only” 35.3%.
  • Airfares, were +10.7% m/m. Lodging away from home +3.28%. But those are smaller weights. New Cars were only +0.18% m/m, so it does look like while New Car prices are going up, Used Car prices are also going down to re-establish a more normal relationship. This will take some time.
  • Car and truck rental was +11.7% m/m. That’s remarkable too. Rental car companies are having trouble getting enough new cars, and that’s one reason used car prices won’t plunge any time soon. But also, people are traveling again!
  • Food & Beverages: +0.96% m/m, +8.5% y/y. Food prices won’t recede soon. In addition to the loss of Russian and Ukraine supplies, there has been a recent culling of chickens due to bird flu. Like we needed that.
  • Core inflation ex-housing declined from 7.6% to 7.5%. Big whoop.
  • Core goods prices, thanks significantly to Used Cars, decelerated to 11.7% from 12.3%. But core good prices accelerated to 4.7% from 4.4%. Until the last 3 months core services hadn’t been at a new 30-year high, but they are now.
  • Remember, services prices are the slower-moving ones. BTW, this month Primary Rents were +0.43% (y/y up to 4.54% from 4.31%) and OER was also +0.43% (y/y 4.45% vs 4.17%). Both still headed higher but both slightly lower than last month.
  • In Medical Care: medicinal drugs was +0.23%; Doctor’s Services +0.49%; Hospital Services +0.40% for an overall increase in medical care of 0.55% m/m. Y/Y up to 2.86%.
  • Education/Communication was DOWN m/m, -0.17%. It’s really the only holdout category here. And if you want to find a place where there should be adjustments to LOWER quality post-COVID (implying more inflation), this is it!
  • Haven’t talked abt Apparel for a while. The y/y increase there is now ~6.8%. Apparel is a category that has been in deflation on net since the Berlin Wall fell. We import almost all of it. And prices have recovered the entire COVID discount and don’t look like they’re slowing.
  • Looking at housing, it is now running a bit hotter than my model; however, I think we could get an offsetting snap-back above the model reversing the underperformance during the eviction moratorium.
  • The main problem with housing inflation isn’t that it is going to 18%, but that it is slow-moving and it’s going to stay high for quite a while. High means 4.5%-5.5%, maybe a bit more even; given its weight in the CPI that means core CPI isn’t going back to 2% soon.
  • Market check, just for comic’s sake: Stocks absolutely love the decline in used cars which led to a softer core number. Breakevens are lower, but not so much.
  • While I wait for the spinning beach ball, this is a good time to remind you that a summary of all of these tweets will be on https://mikeashton.wordpress.com within an hour or so after I conclude. Then later today I will have a podcast version at https://inflationguy.podbean.com
  • The median CPI chart kinda tells the story. This was really never ‘transitory.’ The entire distribution has been steadily moving higher and breaking from the old range to a new range.
  • People ask me the best inflation hedge these days? For most normal people with normal amounts of money (annual purchases of these are limited), i-series savings bonds are the best deal the US Government offers. Maybe ever, at least when real rates everywhere else are negative. “The interest rate on inflation-adjusted U.S. savings bonds will soon approach 10%”  https://on.wsj.com/3rkEFVw
  • We put our database in the cloud so everything is super slow at the moment. I’m going to call a halt here. Some of my other regular charts will be in the post, at https://mikeashton.wordpress.com , so stop by later and check it out (or go there now and subscribe to the post).
  • Bottom line is that the basic story is the same. Broad and deep inflationary pressures. Don’t get distracted by the used cars thing; it didn’t create the inflation and it isn’t putting it out.
  • No sign yet that these pressures are ebbing. In fact, the acceleration in Medical Care bears watching. Also, the extended rise in food & energy is going to have other repercussions.
  • Is the Fed going to hike aggressively and (more importantly) squeeze down the balance sheet aggressively in this context? If stocks and bonds were going to be unchanged, sure. But they’re not going to be.
  • Treasury probably can’t sustainably manage the debt if long interest rates get to 5% (unless inflation stays at 8%). And stocks aren’t worth the same when discounted at 5% as when discounted at 1%. I am confident the Fed will blink. Maybe not as early as I originally thought.
  • One final word and chart. 75% of the weight in the CPI are now inflating faster than 4%. More than a third of the basket is inflating faster than 6%. This is an ugly chart.
  • Thanks for tuning in. Be sure to call click or visit! https://mikeashton.wordpress.com  or https://inflationguy.podbean.com  to get the podcasts. And download the Inflation Guy app!
  • Correction here…the y/y should move up to more like 4.9%, not 4.5%.
  • Highlighting that the number today was mostly dampened by used cars…looks like Median CPI will come in something around 0.5% again. Since September it has been 0.4-0.58% and the y/y will move up to around 4.5%. So don’t get too excited (equity dudes) about the softer core.

The Federal Reserve didn’t get any favors from the Bureau of Labor Statistics today. While the core CPI number was a little below expectations, that miss was entirely due to Used Cars. But while that category was an early champion of the “transitory” crowd, the fact that used car prices are declining slightly after a massive run-up is not a sign that the broader economy is slipping into deflation! It is a sign that that particular market is getting into slightly better balance.

Don’t confuse the micro and the macro. We get wrapped up in the supply and demand thought process because that’s how it works at the micro level. When we look at a product market, we don’t see ‘money’ as being a driver. It is, because you can think about the inflation of any item as (general price inflation) plus (basis: difference in the item and overall), where that basis is driven by those microeconomic supply/demand effects. The former term drives the overall level of inflation; the micro concerns drive the relative price changes. The used car market is getting into (slightly) better balance, but other markets are getting worse. Until the overall level of money growth slows a lot, and the aggregate price changes catch up with the aggregate change in the money supply, inflation is not going to vanish no matter what happens to “aggregate demand.”

As a reminder, M2 has risen some 40% since early 2020. Subtract out net real growth, and you’d expect to see 25%-30% aggregate rise in the price level – if M2 growth went flat. That’s why I say that if the Fed wants to crush inflation, it actually needs to cause M2 to decline, not just level out at 6%. I don’t see any chance of that happening because to do it the Fed would need to remove basically all of the excess reserves and make banks reserve-constrained in lending markets so that lending declines. This seems very unlikely! So will the Fed tighten 275bps? Someday…maybe over a couple of cycles when the real damage from inflation finally wakes them up. Right now, this is a short-term problem to them. I don’t think they’re willing to take a massive market correction to solve what they believe is a short-term problem.

Summary of My Post-CPI Tweets (February 2022)

Below is a summary of my post-CPI tweets. You can (and should!) follow me @inflation_guy. Or, sign up for email updates to my occasional articles here. Investors, issuers and risk managers with interests in this area be sure to stop by Enduring Investments! Get the Inflation Guy app in your app store! Check out the Inflation Guy podcast!

  • Well, here we go! It’s #CPI Day, which this month happens to fall on the day after an intraday 60-cent drop in gasoline futures. THAT will clear your sinuses!
  • Before the walkup, let me tell ya that I will be on @TDANetwork today with Nicole Petallides @Npetallides at 11:50ET. Tune in!
  • Also, when I am done with the tweets today I will post a summary at https://mikeashton.wordpress.com . Later it will be podcasted at http://inflationguy.podbean.com. And all of that also will be linked on the Inflation Guy mobile app. Now with those preliminaries…let’s dig in.
  • We will get fresh 40-year-record highs again today, with the consensus calling for 0.8% m/m on headline (7.9% y/y) and 0.5% m/m on core (6.4% y/y).
  • The last four m/m core inflation figures have been tightly clustered from +0.523% and +0.603%, so the forecast is not terribly adventurous. There have been a few calls for hitting 8% y/y today, but I think some of those are so people can say they called for 8%.
  • We will get there next month, so no hurry.
  • That tight cluster of recent prints is really the main thrust of the story. The distribution of monthly core inflation is no longer around 0.2% per month or a little less. It’s around 0.5%. Hopefully we can get that down to 0.4% or even 0.3% eventually. But we’re not there now.
  • I should say that’s the main thrust of the CONTINUING story. This month, we have other stories courtesy of Vladimir Putin.
  • But, as a reminder, this inflation debacle started LONG before Russia invaded Ukraine. And it was committed with a worse weapon than a gun: the printing press. You can hide from a gun. You can’t hide from the printing press.
  • The Russian invasion caused disruption in the supplies of many commodities and helped spike energy prices. But remember, these are commodities. As long as Russia sells to SOMEONE, the eventual effect on energy prices will be much less than the short-term effect.
  • We covered this before with Chinese purchases of soybeans. So if Russia is constrained to only sell energy to, say, China, then China needs to buy less from, say, Saudi Arabia. Which means the Saudis have more to sell to us, or whoever previously got it from Russia.
  • Commodities are pretty similar. Part of the definition. So it disrupts the flow, but gasoline doesn’t spoil (ok, sure, it spoils, but slowly). I’m much more worried about wheat. If you don’t plant wheat this spring in the Ukraine, there will be less wheat globally for the year.
  • Now, unlike raw gasoline, which we consume in its commodity form and so shows directly in the CPI, raw food commodities don’t take the same path. Your Cheerios have oats, but they also have a lot of packaging, transportation, advertising, and so on.
  • That said, these large and sustained increases in energy affect food inflation through transportation, packaging, fertilizer too. Add to the impact of the war on planted acreage and you have the ingredients for a SUSTAINED increase in food prices for a while.
  • We usually look past food and energy, and focus on core, because food and energy mean revert pretty quickly. They won’t, this time, as quickly and that’s part of why CPI is broadening. And it’s why even after the peak, inflation won’t automatically recede on base effects.
  • Also, if energy prices spike, there is no guarantee it will affect other products so much because producers can smooth through spikes. A spike in wheat need not impact wages. But SUSTAINED increases in prices seep into those other goods and services. And they have.
  • …about wages, which is another interesting and important story. The Atlanta Fed Wage Growth Tracker, for my money the best measure of overall wage pressure since it focuses on continuously-employed people, is up at a 5.1% y/y pace.
  • Wages by that measure have actually been tracking pretty well with Median CPI. The chart of Wages minus median CPI is weirdly stable given everything that is happening. Implication?
  • What that says is that far from “not engaging a wage-price spiral,” the labor force is actually being uber-efficient at getting their wages adjusted. On average, of course, and adjusting for median not core. Median is a better sense of the middle – not driven by used cars, e.g.!
  • Does all of the transparency, the “Indeed.coms” of the world, make it easier to have a wage-price spiral because workers adjust their wage demands more quickly with better information? I wonder.
  • Back to the market and today’s figure. Here are the market changes over the last month. Yes, 1-year inflation expectations are +150bps. 10-years are +45bps. 10-year real yields are -44bps. (No surprise, with real yields down, gold is +8% over that timeframe). This is dramatic.
  • Wanna know what scares me? This chart. Money supply growth is still at 12% y/y, which is bad. But see commercial bank credit? It’s ACCELERATING. Concerning. The Fed directly controls neither of these, when they don’t control the marginal reserve dollar.
  • Now, for the CPI today. Rents will continue to boom, and used cars may settle back slightly. There are some signs of that. But that’s the fireworks. But I am gonna watch pharmaceuticals, and food & energy, more than usual.
  • The real excitement there will be NEXT month – this is Feb’s number and the Ukraine invasion hadn’t happened yet. Whatever today’s figure shows, it will just be the jumping off point for the March spike.
  • The interbank market still has the peak headline CPI in March (March 2021 was +0.31 on core, but April was +0.86, so it will be hard to have a new high in core at least after March), but now it has that peak at 8.55%. Go ahead, gasp. It’s a gasp kind of number.
  • That’s it for the walkup. Look for weakness anywhere in the number – won’t be much of it, so relish what you find. We no longer need clues about whether inflation is coming. It’s here. We need to start finding clues about a deceleration beyond base effects. Haven’t seen any yet.

  • The economists nailed this one. 0.8% on the headline, 0.51% on core (6.42% y/y on core). Yes, all 40+ -year highs. And still pretty much in the zone. Trend core inflation is right around 6-7% at the moment.
  • As expected, used cars fell a little, -0.25% m/m. But y/y still rose, to 41.2%. Other of the “COVID Categories”: airfares +5.2% m/m, lodging away from home +2.2%, new cars/trucks +0.3%, motor vehicle insurance +1.8%, Car/truck rental +3.5%. Ouch all around.
  • (of course, since they’re covid categories, lots of people will want to strip out all of that).
  • Food & Beverage major category: +1% m/m, up to 7.62% y/y. That’s the largest y/y rise in that category of CPI since 1981.
  • Core Goods at 12.3% y/y. Core Services 4.4%.
  • Rents: OER was +0.45% and Primary Rents +0.57%. Both represent accelerations over last month. Y/Y is at 4.3% for OER and 4.2% for Primary.
  • Medical Care continues to be a conundrum. Overall, that category rose 0.17% m/m after +0.85% last month. Pharma was +0.4% and continues to be the strong one. Doctors’ Services fell again. And this month Hospital Services also fell. I don’t understand that at all.
  • Core inflation ex-housing was 7.60%. in March 2020 it was 1.49% and it fell to 0.33% in May 2020.
  • Apparel, +0.72%. Recreation +0.73% m/m. “Other” +1.06% m/m.
  • Within Food & Beverages: Food at home (8.2% of the CPI): +1.4% NSA m/m; +8.6% y/y. Food away from home: +0.4% m/m, +6.8% y/y. Alcoholic Beverages +0.9% m/m, +3.5% y/y.
  • Food at home AND food away from home both at 42-year highs.
  • drilling down, the ONLY categories of food and beverages that declined in price: Fresh Fish and Seafood, -0.70% m/m in NSA terms, Bananas, -0.10%, Lettuce -0.29%, Tomatoes -1.88%, uncooked beef steaks -0.19%, and Pork Chops -0.01%. Most of that was seasonal as y/y accelerated.
  • Early guess at Median CPI is +0.54% m/m, which is down only slightly from last month’s spike. That median is now looking like core is what tells you that this isn’t just one-off categories.
  • Incidentally, my median estimate might be low…the median categories look to be the regional housing OERs, which the Cleveland Fed seasonally adjusts separately. I’m more likely to be low the way the chips fell. Either way, Median at 4.60% is really disturbing.
  • Let’s do the four pieces charts. First, Food & Energy. Unlike prior spikes, this is going to roll over more slowly. The rate of change will mean-revert. But the food part I think will remain a positive inflation contributor for much longer than normal (prices will keep rising).
  • Core goods. Nothing much to say. This is beyond automobiles. Part of this is pass-through of energy prices (via freight, packaging), so it’s a non-core effect on core. Some are bottlenecks. None look to be easing in the near-term.
  • This chart, piece 3, is interesting because about a quarter of this is doctors’ and hospital services, which have been pretty tame so far. And yet, it’s almost at 4%.
  • Finally, Rent of Shelter. Almost at 5%. So actually, the core-services piece is holding down inflation now…not shelter. Remember that shelter is the big, slow piece. Some people are calling for OER at 7%. I don’t get that from my models. But still, it’s going higher.
  • …and rents are part of the wage-price feedback loop. (Remember that the dip in 2021 was largely artificial because of the eviction moratorium, and everyone knew it, which is why it didn’t change wage demands much).
  • Almost 80% of the consumption basket is inflating faster than 4%. About a third is inflating faster than 6%.
  • At least by one set of models, the OER rise may be cresting soon. I’m a little skeptical but that’s what the model says. However, it’s not going to turn around and drop, which means core inflation will be high for a while. Not just 2022.
  • So I said to look for evidence of deceleration. There’s not much. But there’s a LITTLE. The Enduring Investments Inflation Diffusion Index declined to 35 from 41. That’s not a lot, but it’s in the right direction.
  • So wrapping up: there’s no real sign of any ebbing of inflation pressures. In fact, there are some signs that food inflation will stay elevated for longer than the normal oscillation cycle. But we are closer to the end of the spike, anyway, than to the beginning.
  • Core inflation will likely peak next month, and headline inflation in the next couple of months. That’s good. But we’re not going to go back to 2%. Right now, the monthly prints point to an underlying core rate around 6%. I suspect we will end 2022 in the 5s, or high 4s.
  • If there’s any chance to get to the 3s in 2023, it would be because the Fed starts to shrink its balance sheet with some urgency. I see zero chance of that.
  • In fact, as I’ve long said – the Fed is not going to tighten at every meeting. They’ll have excuses to skip meetings and assess.
  • For example, although Russia/Ukraine has nothing to do with monetary policy, it took 50bps off the table for this month – we will get a 25bp cosmetic hike in rates – and probably means they skip next meeting. And then once inflation peaks they’ll want to see how fast it ebbs.
  • Don’t want to overtighten, you know. The net result is that inflation is getting embedded in our psyche and it will be very long until we get 2-3% core inflation on a regular basis.
  • That’s all for today. Thanks for tuning in. Catch me on @TDANetwork at 11:50ET and look for my tweet summary at https://mikeashton.wordpress.com . Curious what tools we’re working on in inflation? Stop by http://enduringinvestments.com . Subscribe to my podcast. https://inflationguy.podbean.com Etcetera!

Core inflation for the last 5 months has been in a tight range suggesting 6%-7% is the underlying trend rate; this started long before Russia invaded Ukraine. The invasion means that food inflation will take longer to ebb than it usually does, as not only are we getting pass-through from the extended period of high energy prices (affecting freight, packaging, and fertilizer) but we’re also seeing plantings in Ukraine likely to be disrupted. But it isn’t just food and energy, but everything across the board. A plurality of the consumption basket is inflating faster than 6%!

And this is seeping into wages, and quite quickly at that. Wages are actually adjusting to the level of unemployment more quickly than history would suggest they should be. Based on where unemployment was 9 months ago, the Atlanta Fed Wage Growth Tracker should be around 3.5%. Based on where unemployment is now, it should be around 5%. It’s already there.

I showed a chart earlier illustrating that wages are not trailing inflation in the way that we normally expect that they would. Workers, possibly because there’s been so much turnover thanks to COVID and possibly because of the transparency of wages these days, are getting wage adjustments that keep them about where they historically have been with respect to inflation. That’s remarkable, but also problematic if there is anything to the “wage-price-spiral” thought process.

But at the end of the day I still don’t think the Fed is willing to move fast and break things. In the classroom, the Taylor Rule says they are dramatically behind the curve and should be hiking rates. Of course, the classroom also says that they should do that by adjusting reserves, which they no longer do, so the textbook is clearly flexible. But in the real world, Fed moves do not happen on paper and they don’t just move prices and output. They also crack over-levered entities and cause financial distress in unexpected places that leads to other bad things. The Fed has “learned” this over the years and it’s one of many reasons that I don’t think we’re going to see 200bps of tightening. And probably not 100bps of tightening, in 2022. They will be cautious, measure-twice-cut-once, speak sagely and calmly in the press conferences, and hope to God that they haven’t really messed it all up.

They have.

Summary of My Post-CPI Tweets (January 2022)

February 10, 2022 Leave a comment

Below is a summary of my post-CPI tweets. You can (and should!) follow me @inflation_guy. Or, sign up for email updates to my occasional articles here. Investors, issuers and risk managers with interests in this area be sure to stop by Enduring Investments! Get the Inflation Guy app in your app store! Check out the Inflation Guy podcast!

  • Suddenly, going to #CPI Day is like going to the circus! Not least because of all the clowns opining about #inflation. For me, it’s just one more day as the Inflation Guy; it’s just that I have more company now since it seems EVERYBODY is an inflation guy all of a sudden.
  • Today we will set some more multi-decade highs in CPI, and in core CPI, and in Median CPI. The last three core CPI figures have been (after revisions) +0.60%, +0.52%, and +0.56% and the Street sees another 0.5% today.
  • It’s hard to disagree too strongly with that forecast, because the recent numbers have been very broad and not just used cars or Covid categories. Rents have been accelerating, as expected (more on that later). But it’s the breadth that has changed the story.
  • That said, I would not be terribly shocked with a somewhat softer used cars number this month, though I think New Cars will stay strong for a while, and we could get some weakness in airfares thanks to the brief Omicron scare.
  • Also, it’s February which means we are looking at January data – January data always have a larger error bar, which is why last week’s Jobs figure wasn’t really “surprising” econometrically. We also have the annual adjustments in seasonal factors and in component weights.
  • Those changes, despite some breathless analyses that circulated about how dramatic all of this will be and how profoundly it will affect CPI…won’t be the story. Sorry. The quick summary is that energy and vehicles gained 3% in weight and everything else lost a little.
  • Weights on apparel, medical care, food and beverages, rents, education/communication, and “other” all declined. But there were lots of little changes camouflaged in there. The weight of elder care just about doubled, for example, even while medical care as a whole went down.
  • But again – don’t stay up late worrying about it. It’s an effect that tends to dampen inflation slightly over time, since stuff that goes up gets a higher weight – and if it mean reverts, it has a higher weight when it goes down (and v.v.). But it happens every year.
  • With more volatility in the figure, it will matter more than most years, but the absolute value of the whole darn number is much larger too. I don’t worry about the second and third-order effects right now. There’s enough to look at with first-order effects.
  • OK back to the current market and today’s number. This chart shows the changes from 1 month ago for real rates, inflation expectations, and nominal rates. Some of the decline in infl expectations is carry, by the way.
  • As I said up top, expectations are for a big number this month, and we’ll see an even higher y/y next month before we get to a peak thereafter. So right about the time the Fed starts to raise rates, y/y inflation will start coming down. Mostly b/c year ago comps get harder.
  • Think that’s an accident of timing? It’s important to remember that the Fed is a political animal (ever since Greenspan), and it’s politically expedient to talk tough about inflation. It’s not politically expedient to crush markets, so they’ll try not to ACTUALLY be tough.
  • If y/y headline inflation starts to decline when they start to tighten, it will make it much easier to take it easy. I think the extent of rate hikes embedded in the curve right now are very unlikely. But the Fed will still TALK a good game.
  • Is the FOMC serious though? Well look at this chart of y/y changes in M2 in the US, Europe, and Japan. All are off the highs, but…in the US, money growth REMAINS very high; higher in fact than at just about any time other than the 1970s.
  • That doesn’t look like a hawkish central bank to me. And if they are just going to slow-play it while waiting for inflation to go back to 2%, they’re going to be disappointed. “Normal” is more like 4% now. And I’m not sure we’ll get back there quickly the way things are going.
  • A couple of items on rents, because that’s the big, slow moving piece with momentum. On the one hand, Owners’ Equivalent Rent has finally caught up with our model now that the eviction moratorium is over, but it has more to go. And parts of our model are less sanguine, actually.
  • The gap between asking and effective rents is also still wide, though narrowing. It will take another 3-6 months for it to close, and that’s when we can say the eviction moratorium is out of the data. This chart is as of the most recent data, quarter ended December.
  • Here’s something else fun. This chart is option-implied dividends on XHB, the SPDR Homebuilders ETF. It seems to have been leading rents by about 6mo. So again, we have at least 6 mo of further high prints in rents I think.
  • Anyway, the bottom line is that even if today’s number surprises on the low side, there are still high numbers ahead. And if it surprises on the high side, the Fed isn’t doing 50bp in March (unless they really change their talk first, because they aren’t into surprises).
  • Only market-clearing price if the market is free. With the eviction moratorium in place it wasn’t, and we’re still working through that.
  • Replying to @MarketInterest
  • Good luck! I will have a summary of all my tweets at mikeashton.wordpress.com sometime mid-morning and then I plan to put out an Inflation Guy podcast (inflationguy.podbean.com) sometime today.
  • Podcast #18 discussed how inflation is the cost of the option to be long cash waiting for opportunities. It was a good one. Are you curious how my investors are sidestepping that cost while retaining liquidity? Ping me via the contact form at enduringinvestments.com
  • Also look for the Inflation Guy app in your app store/play store (once we get enough users we will probably do livestreams to those users, rather than on Twitter).
  • That’s all for the walk-up. And still time to grab a coffee. CPI is in 5 minutes.

  • Welp, 6% on core. Now that we have exceeded the early ’90s high we can say it: highest core in 40 years.
  • Congratulations all around. Take a bow, fiscal spendthrifts. Curtain call, monetary firebugs. 0.58% on core CPI, 6.04% y/y.
  • Primary Rents were +0.54% m/m, 3.77% y/y. Wow. Owners’ Equivalent Rent was 0.42% m/m, 4.09% y/y. But hey, Lodging Away from Home fell 3.92%. Thanks, Omicron!!!!
  • Airfares, though, rose 2.3% m/m. There was some expectation of softness there thanks to the brief virus surge. But I guess it didn’t last long enough, since plans for flights have longer lead times.
  • Cars befuddled me. I thought Used might be soft, but they were +1.47% m/m (+40.5% y/y). I thought New Cars would stay strong, but they were flat m/m.
  • Food & Beverages +0.85% (not a core category obviously). Apparel +1.06%. Medical Care +0.66%. Recreation +0.88%. “Other” +0.76%. Criminy.
  • Medicinal Drugs +0.86% m/m. That’s NSA, so the y/y rose but only up to 1.33%. Still, drug prices are on the rise.
  • Hospital services +0.5% m/m, +3.6% y/y. But this has been more trendless around that figure. Doctors’ Services fell another -0.08%, down to 2.63%/yr. Why do people not want to pay doctors?
  • Overall, core goods rose to +11.7% y/y. Core services rose to +4.1% y/y. To review, the HOPE is that overall inflation settles down to…which one? Happy with 4.1% are we?
  • Lots of household services rose. Water/sewer/trash collection +1% m/m. Window/floor coverings +1.6%. Furniture/bedding +2.4%. Appliances +2.6%. Housekeeping supplies +1.6%. Tools/hardware +1.8%. These are NSA but still.
  • Core inflation ex-housing: 7.22%. I only have this series back to 1983. Fun chart.
  • Only two categories fell more than 10% annualized on the month: Car/Truck rental (-58% annualized), Lodging Away from Home (-38%). There were 20 that rose more than 10% annualized. To be fair, 6 of those were food and energy.
  • My first guess at median CPI is that it will be 0.54%, which would be the highest so far.
  • OK, four pieces charts. Piece 1, food and energy. We feel this but it almost seems like it isn’t a big story any more! At least it mean reverts…but the period of mean reversion might be longer this time because of knock-on effects (energy affecting fertilizer, e.g.)
  • Piece 2. No commentary needed.
  • Piece 3, Core services less rent of shelter. This is starting to be disturbing. For a long time this was steady to lower. Not clear it is any longer. It’s still pulling DOWN on core, but not as much.
  • [Piece 4] Rent of Shelter was SLIGHTLY higher in 2001, but otherwise you have to go back to the very early 1990s. And this is still going to go a bit higher at least.
  • Here is a plot of the distribution of price changes. About 80% of all categories are now inflating faster than 3%. About 65% of them are faster than 4%.
  • So, this is a record high for the Enduring Investments Inflation Diffusion Index. Not that any actual consumer needs to be told that inflation is hitting everything.
  • At this hour, 10y inflation swaps are up about 0.5bp. That’s less than you would expect just from 1y swaps are +20bps. It’s incredible how committed people are, mentally, to the idea that inflation will return to the neighborhood of 2%.
  • But look at this chart again. Four core prints in a row in a nice tight spread around a 6% or so annualized rate. The central point of the inflation distribution HAS SHIFTED. I don’t think it’s actually at 6%, probably more like 4%. But ain’t 2%.
  • What will the Fed do? 25bps. Remember, when forecasters started saying 50bps was possible there was firm pushback from policymakers. Equity markets don’t believe that either. They will go slower than expected and stop earlier than expected, IMO.
  • A dove doesn’t change his stripes.
  • That’s all for today’s train wreck. I’ll have a summary up on mikeashton.wordpress.com a little later. And a podcast on inflationguy.podbean.com later today. And of course all of that will be linked on the Inflation Guy app. Thanks for tuning in!

I keep hearing talk about “the ongoing inflation debate.” This starts to be confusing. What exactly is this debate about? At one time, it was a debate about whether there would be inflation at all. “No way,” said the non-inflation camp, “there’s too much slack in the labor market.” That debate ended a long time ago, as inflation began to surge long before the employment gap closed. Then there was the debate about whether inflation was “transitory.” That debate, too, ended as it’s eminently clear that except in the trivial sense that all things are transitory, inflation right now is not. There was a debate about causes, as some people pointed to the clogged ports and said “see, that’s why we have inflation. It’ll decline once we get the ports moving!” Other people pointed to shortages of various things, like computer chips, that have knock-on effects in other products. At one time, the Biden Administration argued for spending another few trillion for infrastructure, because that would lower inflation by improving those bottlenecks. Seriously. And I think they believed it. But how does that explain rents? How does it explain core services inflation above 4%? It doesn’t.

I’ll tell you what does explain all of that, though: money supply growth still in the teens, and government still riotously spending as if we remain in a calamitous depression.

I mean, wouldn’t it be weird if the single clearest prediction of monetarism happened to be right but it was a total coincidence and not because monetarism is right?

Inflation is going to ebb in 2022, probably. It is at 6% on core, and that’s probably going to go a little higher before it comes down. But there’s nothing in the data to suggest that inflation is going to drop back to 2%. Or even 3%. There’s nothing in the data that suggests the culprit is clogged ports or other bottlenecks. I expect core inflation to slowly decelerate to the 4% neighborhood…but the last four months of Core CPI have averaged a 6.8% annual rate, and in a pretty tight spread of 0.52% m/m on the low side to 0.60% on the high side. You can make an argument that the new distribution is coalescing around 6%, and that is not at all inconsistent with 13% money growth.

If you want lower inflation, then the prescription is pretty plain: decelerate money growth to at or below the desired pace of nominal GDP growth (real GDP + desired inflation). And stop spending from the federal coffers as if there is no cost to doing so. You may end up with, and probably will, less real GDP and more inflation in the near-term than you’d like, but that’s the way you get back to reasonable inflation in the medium term.

Of course, that path would be disastrous for stock and bond markets, so I give it a very small chance of happening. Not zero, but it’s hard to do this when the Fed is now an overtly political creature. They give press conferences for goodness’ sake! How do you run difficult policy when you have to face the microphones every month? Ask the coach of any team that’s in a rebuilding year.

Monetarily-speaking, we need to be in a rebuilding year. But it’s so much easier to just extend and pretend…

Well, here is one positive thought anyway: I wonder if numbers like this will finally quiet the “BLS is cooking the CPI figures!” crowd. Because if they’re cooking the numbers, they’re doing a darn poor job of it.

Summary of My Post-CPI Tweets (December 2021)

January 12, 2022 2 comments

Below is a summary of my post-CPI tweets. You can (and should!) follow me @inflation_guy. Or, sign up for email updates to my occasional articles here. Investors, issuers and risk managers with interests in this area be sure to stop by Enduring Investments! Get the Inflation Guy app in your app store! Check out the Inflation Guy podcast!

  • Welcome to the first #CPI Day of 2022 (although technically it’s really the last of 2021 since we’re releasing December #inflation figures). Exciting times, as headline inflation might sport a 7% handle and core inflation definitely will be well above 5% y/y.
  • The last three numbers have been so broad, so worrisome OUTSIDE of the “Covid Categories”, that even the Federal Reserve is saying the right things. Will they really hike rates 4 times this year? I’m skeptical but we will see.
  • Core CPI for October and November were 0.599% and 0.535% m/m, respectively…but most importantly, there wasn’t a clear outlier causing these jumps. Median inflation, which is unaffected by those tails, has had three straight months above 0.45% (5.4% annualized).
  • Not only the Fed, but also the market, is finally starting to listen a little. This chart shows the changes from 1 month ago for real rates, inflation expectations, and nominal rates. All higher from mid-December.
  • But the theme from economists over the next few months – brace for it – will be “But economists expect inflation to moderate in the months ahead.” You’ll see this everywhere.
  • That’s because after easy year-ago comps for the next 3 months, they get difficult in April-June. So, while core inflation should get to 6% in early Q2, the y/y numbers PROBABLY won’t get worse than that (in 2022).
  • So, mix that story with “see, the Fed is serious and inflation is already coming down” and you’ll get the touts for stonks going in full force. Don’t worry, be happy. Buy the stuff that Wall Street needs to sell. Etc.
  • And there IS some good news. For example, the rate of increase in overland truckload rates is declining. Still high, but declining. Since trucking goes into all kinds of goods, it’s often a leader of the rate of change (not always).
  • Similarly, some modest good news from global shipping rates, which are down from their highs although edging back up a little (chart shows east-west container rates).
  • but … Other than those big base effects in April/May/June, there’s not a lot of reason to think the m/m #inflation figures will drop down to 0.15-0.2 again.
  • Going forward there will be a peak…but won’t be as serious as you think. We can all imagine used cars fading eventually. But no one bothers to imagine what will go up. So if you forecast a reversion to the mean for the first and ignore the second, of COURSE you forecast a peak.
  • Example: what about insurance? President Biden’s latest plan is to force insurance companies to provide 8 free COVID tests per person per month. Ignore whether the tests exist, but … Who do you think pays for that? Insurance company? Nope. More policy error.
  • What about China re-shutting some parts of its economy due to Omicron? Remember, (as I wrote in February 2020): “COVID-19 in China is a Supply Shock to the World” https://inflationguy.blog/2020/02/25/covid-19-in-china-is-a-supply-shock-to-the-world/ This is not policy error, just bad luck. But bad luck happens.
  • Last month I said “This is not about the pandemic any longer; it is about policy response to the pandemic. It is almost entirely policy error.” I feel strongly about this. While there is tough talk on this from the Fed, let’s see if it’s followed by tough action.
  • I’m concerned about that, since the Fed is still getting the story wrong. Powell says higher labor costs are not driving inflation. Well – that’s because labor costs generally FOLLOW inflation. Labor pushes when they see their own cost of living going up. Not before.
  • And thanks to workers’ pricing power, wage increases should rise around another 1% y/y by Q3, based on the current unemployment rate (green). This is good news for workers, bad news for consumers. Wages don’t cause inflation but they DO give it momentum.
  • So inflation will peak around April, but core will ebb to maybe 4%, not 2%.
  • Back to today’s number. Consensus is 0.4%/0.5% headline/core for the month and 7.0%/5.4% y/y. The ‘inside market’ is really 0.46-0.52 on core. The interbank market has the headline figure reaching 7.03%.
  • But remember this is December, and there are lots of weird seasonals, so anything can happen.
  • We are still watching rents, which should remain solid for a while here. Catching up from the end of the eviction moratorium, but there’s still plenty of heat in the housing market generally. And amazingly, we’re still watching used cars.
  • Here’s a chart of the level of used car prices. Not exactly collapsing! I mean, wow! I don’t know anyone who thought we’d get another leg higher.
  • And even the rate of change is reaching new highs. So we will likely get another push in the CPI from used autos, and new cars as well since they’re a substitute.
  • But most important in today’s #CPI remains the breadth. That’s the main focus today. If we get 0.7% but it’s all used cars, that’s not nearly as significant as if we get 0.4% and there are no outliers at all. That has been the recent story and I expect it to continue.
  • Good luck!  I will have a summary of all my tweets at https://mikeashton.wordpress.com  sometime mid-morning and then I plan to put out an Inflation Guy podcast  (https://inflationguy.podbean.com) sometime today. Like, click subscribe, all that.
  • Also look for the Inflation Guy app in your app store (once we get enough users we will probably do livestreams to those users, rather than on Twitter).
  • And finally, book your free place at the Institutional Fixed Income Virtual Summit on January 22nd. https://lnkd.in/dab2WfEP
  • Hey! I finished with the walk-up early. Still time to grab a coffee. Number in 7 minutes.

  • A bit higher than expected 0.5%/0.6% on core. Headline did get to 7%, core hit 5.5%. Bloomberg kinda slow-rolling the seasonally-adjusted core number so  don’t know the 2nd digit yet.
  • OK, here we go. The seasonally-adjusted core number, m/m, was 0.5501. So it just BARELY squeaked out the 0.6%. Still, higher than expected but not drastically.
  • Jumping out at me is the 1.72% rise in Apparel prices m/m. Apparel is only 2.7% of the basket but has been in deflation for years, punctuated by occasional attempts at price increases. Right now Apparel is +5.8% y/y. Some of that is likely shipping b/c apparel isn’t made here.
  • Used Cars, true to form, +3.5% m/m after +2.5% last month. Y/Y up to 37.3%. New cars +1% m/m.
  • Overall, core goods and services continue to look…um…disturbing?
  • Here is core services by itself. 4% looks like the big level. However, it’s no longer the case that this inflation is all about goods. Ergo, it isn’t all about supply chain.
  • OK in the COVID categories, 1.18% m/m from lodging away from home; +2.72% m/m from airfares. Car and truck RENTAL though was -5.3% m/m. That’s only 0.13% of CPI though!
  • Rents: Primary rents +0.39%, 3.33% y/y. That’s slightly lower than the last couple of months but still pretty hot. Owners’ Equivalent Rent +0.40%, 3.79% y/y. Ditto – lower but still hot. 4.8% annualized from a third of core would make it hard to get core back to 2%!
  • Medical Care was +0.28% m/m. But Pharma (+0.01%), Doctors’ Services (-0.05%), and Hospital Services (+0.16%) were all lower. Which means it came from insurance.
  • Here is medical insurance, y/y. Up 1.6% m/m. Medical insurance is a residual in the CPI (not directly calculated), but this is where added costs to insurance companies is showing up.
  • So core inflation at 5.5% is still “the highest since 1991”, but starting next month it will probably be “the highest since 1982” since the 1991 high was 5.6%.
  • Vehicle insurance (-16.8% one-month change, annualized) and Car and Truck Rental (-48%) were the only core categories that fell more than 10% annualized.
  • Categories that ROSE >10% annualized: Jewelry/Watches (+59%),Used Cars/Trucks(+51%),Womens/Girls Apparel(+30%),Public Transport(+26%),Motor Vehicle Parts/Equip (+21%),Footwear(+20%),Lodging Away from Home(+15%),Household Furnishings(+14%),Mens/Boys Apparel(+14%),New Cars(12%)
  • I am afraid this also looks like we are going to have another 0.45% or so on Median inflation. Hard to tell b/c regional OERs are the median categories it looks like, so it might be as low as 0.38% but unlikely I think.
  • Core ex-housing is +6.4% y/y. It’s worth remembering that core is currently being pulled DOWN by rents.
  • Folks, grab the reins on the change in the CPI weightings. They are a totally normal biannual thing. The changes will be larger this time than normal because consumption patterns changed – but there’s no conspiracy. Consumption patterns DID change. That’s all that’s happening.
  • Stories remain approximately the same for the four-pieces charts. The first is Food & Energy – most volatile, and the best chance for dropping the y/y headline number. But still, pretty ugly and this likely affects wage negotiations as people pay more for food and gas!
  • Core goods – a chunk is new and used autos. And there is upward pressure from shipping and trucking rates. But those are ebbing a little. This will eventually come back to earth, on a rate of change basis, but that doesn’t mean the price LEVELS will decline.
  • Core services ex-rents. This is still looking a little perky although not breaking to new highs like a lot of the rest of the index. Medical Care is actually holding down inflation. But uptick in health insurance is concerning.
  • Rent of Shelter – totally expected if you’ve been watching housing. Still has more to go! Again, it’s going to be hard to get core CPI back to 2% while rents are running 4-5% or more.
  • Slight good news on distribution. The weight of the consumption basket that’s inflating more-slowly than 3% is back above 25%!
  • OK, one more chart and then a quick wrap-up. Remember later to check out the summary at https://mikeashton.wordpress.com  and look for the podcast version of it at https://inflationguy.podbean.com
  • I said the most important part of this report was the breadth. And it was again a very broad report; Median CPI will again be around 0.4%-0.5%. The Enduring Investments Inflation Diffusion Index reached a modest new high.
  • There is nothing in today’s number that suggests the underlying inflation pressures are ebbing. The y/y change will eventually come down because the comps will get more difficult, but there is NO SIGN that core will be dropping back to 2%.
  • My base case is that we end 2022 with something like a 4% core inflation rate. Could be as low as 3.5%, but the potential miss on the upside is larger than that.
  • The Fed is talking tough, but talk is cheap. They’re still easing at this hour! Eventually they’ll stop digging the hole. When will they start filling it in – not by raising rates which has small effect if any on inflation, but by selling bonds? Don’t hold your breath.
  • I think they’ll raise rates once or twice, maybe even thrice if bond and stock markets don’t seem to mind. But eventually, they’ll mind because discount rates matter. When that happens, I can’t imagine the Fed keeps sticking the knife in.
  • We have Volcker-like inflation, but we have no Volcker.
  • And that’s the problem. Thanks for tuning in! If you’re curious about what we do at Enduring Investments, come by http://enduringinvestments.com and say hi. I do these tweet storms for many reasons – but some of those reasons are commercial! See you soon.

This was, sadly, not a very surprising report. Inflationary pressures remain broad and deep, and the Fed today is still purchasing bonds and adding more reserves to the system. The FOMC is in a bit of a pickle since they labored so long under the false “inflation is transitory” story. The fact that they couldn’t foresee that the natural consequence of massive fiscal stimulus financed by massive monetary stimulus would be inflation is mind-boggling, but it does seem that they really did think that inflation was transitory and caused by supply-chain issues. Amazing.

So now, they’re behind the curve and really need to catch up and get ahead of this process. The inflation mindset is becoming entrenched (and I think already has), and all the Fed can do is talk about how they’re going to be gradual, gradual, a few hikes this year; maybe they’ll eventually think about shrinking the balance sheet; please don’t panic please don’t panic please don’t panic. But the slower the Fed goes, the harder they’ll have to squeeze liquidity to get inflation out of the system. And that will break a few eggs.

Volcker was not afraid to break some eggs. He saw that it was better to break eggs now than to be unable to afford eggs tomorrow. I do not currently see anyone at the Federal Reserve, or in central banking circles generally, made of that stern stuff. Ask me what inflation this year will be and I will say 4-5% on core. Ask me what it will be next year and I’ll say, probably about the same. Ask me what inflation will be in 2025 and I will say…

Do you have a Volcker? Because if not, we’re Volcked.

Summary of My Post-CPI Tweets (November 2021)

December 10, 2021 2 comments

Below is a summary of my post-CPI tweets. You can (and should!) follow me @inflation_guy. Or, sign up for email updates to my occasional articles here. Investors, issuers and risk managers with interests in this area be sure to stop by Enduring Investments! Get the Inflation Guy app in your app store! Check out the Inflation Guy podcast!

  • It’s #CPI Day again. And it’s official, this is now the MOST WATCHED economic number of the month. It’s crazy to think that if you had told me two years ago that we would be pushing 40-year highs on #inflation in 2021, I’d have thought you were mad.
  • Amazingly, economists’ predictions for today’s figure would take headline inflation to 6.8% and core to 4.9%. The month/month forecast for CORE is actually 0.5% – an amazing testimony in itself.
  • Some economists are ‘getting religion.’ The last couple of numbers have been shocking (especially last month’s). The September CPI released in Oct was only 0.24% core, but it was broad.
  • The October CPI released last month was 0.599%, AND it was incredibly broad. Median CPI rose 0.57% m/m – by far the largest increase since 1982. Not even close.
  • So this month, people aren’t looking for retracements in an outlier. There’s nothing much to retrace. Indeed, it looks like we might get another push from autos.
  • Used car prices in the CPI rose 2.5% m/m last month; it could be 4% this month. It COULD even be more than that.
  • New car prices have also risen 1.3% in each of the last two months. With used car prices skyrocketing, it’s hard to imagine new car prices flattening out. So from autos, you could contribute 0.2% to core, if they play to chalk.
  • Rents have also been jumping. Unlike Used Cars, only the timing was surprising. I thought it would take longer after the end of the eviction moratorium to see 5% rates of increase and more, but here we are. Both OER and Primary rents were +0.42%-0.45% each of last two months.
  • If that repeats, it adds another 0.16% or so to core. So then you just need to find price increases of 0.14% from everything else in the core categories, to get to your 0.5% forecast. So it’s not a big reach.
  • Lots can go wrong in any month, of course, which is why I try not to overanalyze the number pre-snap. But 0.5% doesn’t seem wildly off as a baseline guess, to me. (The inflation swaps market sees more like 6.9% on headline, so upside risk.)
  • The bottom line is this: although next month we may get some drag from gasoline thanks to the sharp fall in wholesale prices at the end of November, we’re still very likely to hit 7% on headline and will certainly exceed 5% on core over the next few months. That’s amazing.
  • It gets more amazing: Because of easy comps from last year, averaging 0.06% on core for Dec, Jan, Feb, it doesn’t take a lot of imagination to get y/y core to 6% by the end of Q1. Then it should recede…but it’s not going back to 2%.
  • So to put it bluntly, inflation right now is not aiming for the 5 o’clock news. It’s aiming for the history books.
  • Why is this happening? Simple: too much spending, too fast, financed with newly created reserves. Period. The shortages result from getting incomes back above pre-covid levels before we were ready to provide the goods and services to the people waving dollars.
  • Going forward it is hard to see how this resolves easily. There are still many more people not in the workforce than there were pre-pandemic…but more income, by a lot. Demand>supply, and financed by 12% money growth.
  • Moreover, one final thought and a h/t to Barclays for their chart of the HH index. The Herfindahl–Hirschman Index is a very widely-used (especially in antitrust) measure of market concentration. Over the last few decades, it has risen precipitously, meaning more concentration.
  • When market power is concentrated, so is pricing power. And those mega-firms that now dominate just about every niche in American life have re-learned that price increases can stick in this kind of environment. Who can blame them? You build market power for exactly this moment.
  • It’s hard to unscramble this egg. So hang on to your juevos, number in a few.
  • Cents and Sensibility: the Inflation Guy Podcast
  • inflationguy.podbean.com
  • As a reminder, I will have a summary of all my tweets at https://mikeashton.wordpress.com  sometime mid-morning and then I plan to put out an Inflation Guy podcast (https://inflationguy.podbean.com) sometime today.

  • Yawn. CPI as-expected. Just a soothing 6.4% annualized pace of core. 0.53% m/m,
  • Core was actually VERY close to printing 5.0%. Using the seasonally-adjusted numbers you’d get 4.96%, which would round up. NSA numbers give you 4.93%. Doesn’t matter; will be over 5% next month.
  • So, highest headline inflation since 1982, highest core since 1991, with more to come on both.
  • Running through the usual suspects: Used cars were 2.50%. That’s less than I expected. There’s still make-up there next month, believe it or not.
  • Owner’s Equivalent Rent +0.44% again this month. Primary Rents +0.42% again this month. Eerily steady at a high level. This month, Lodging Away from Home was +2.98% m/m. Consequently, the Housing subgroup was +0.52% m/m, 4.8% y/y.
  • I mentioned Used Cars; New Cars was 1.13% (seasonally adjusted) m/m. Car and Truck Rental +1.1% m/m. Airfares this month (a “Covid category”) +4.75%
  • So with airfares, lodging away from home, used and new cars, motor vehicle insurance (+0.66% m/m)…doesn’t look like this wave of COVID is doing much to hold down prices.
  • An eye on Medicinal Drugs is warranted. y/y it’s back to flat. Doctors’ Services also up smartly this month, 4.26% y/y. Hospital Services down m/m but still 3.5% y/y.
  • Overall, Core Goods rose to 9.4% y/y, with Core Services up to 3.4% y/y.
  • Interestingly, two of the eight major subgroups declined m/m: Recreation, and Education/Communication. And we still got 0.5% on core!
  • Here are core goods and core services. Supply chain still an issue for goods. Core services the highest since 2008, and will go higher still thanks to rents.
  • Core inflation ex-housing back up to 5.72% y/y. It was higher in June at 5.81%. But otherwise…back to early 1980s.
  • So let’s see. Only category that declined at a faster than 10% annualized rate was Jewelry and Watches (-20.5% annualized m/m).
  • The list of categories >10% annualized growth. Excluding the 6 food/energy line items there: Mens/Boys apparel, public transport, lodging AFH, Used cars, Women’s/Girls apparel, New cars, Motor vehicle parts/equip, misc personal goods, car/truck rental, tobacco,househld frnishings
  • Looks like the median CPI category will be an OER subindex, which gets separate seasonals, so hard to forecast exactly but another 0.44% m/m or so from Median pushing it up to 3.5% (just my early guess).
  • Median m/m. One exhibit in the ‘broadening’ argument.
  • Once again, not a lot of huge outliers here. Although November and December numbers get harder to tell because the seasonal adjustments are more important (e.g. lodging away from home, negative before SA but strong after SA).
  • Why did Recreation decline? Well, thinks like “admissions”, photographic equipment, cable/satellite television service all declined. So the cake we are supposed to eat is at least getting cheaper.
  • Fascinatingly, 10-year breakevens are down HARD, -4bps on the day to 2.45%. With core pushing 5% and rising. Wonder what kind of number folks needed to stay long??
  • Here are the Four Pieces. Food & Energy. Near multi-decade highs as well. And it’s not just energy – there are ripple effects in fertilizer and therefore food. The Food subindex itself was +5.82% y/y.
  • Core Goods – here is where the supply chain argument is most-salient. Obviously cars are in here and a big part of it. But not all of it! it will come down, but all the way to zero? I have my doubts. And…not soon.
  • Core services ex-shelter. Still the best news out there. Medical care not unreasonable. Mind you, this would have scared me two years ago, but right now it looks soothing compared to the other charts.
  • And the part that was the most-predictable (but took an amazingly long time for people to catch on to): rent of shelter. This has another 1% or more to go, at least. And it’s a big chunk of CPI.
  • The distribution of price changes by CPI component weights. Less of a distribution than a splatter, at the moment. Not much going up less than 3%!
  • And let’s put numbers on that. Only 20% of the consumption basket has risen LESS than 3% over the last year.
  • Almost double the weight of the categories slower than 3%? The categories faster than 4%.
  • Lastly, the Enduring Investments Inflation Diffusion Index reached a new record high. The inflation pressures now are broader than the deflation pressures in the Global Financial Crisis.
  • So wrapping this up…what does this mean for the Fed? In the Old Days, the Fed by now would have already tightened a bunch. Currently, we’re talking about reducing the amount they add in liquidity, maybe a little faster. And possibly raising rates in 2022. That is, UNLESS…
  • …unless stocks drop like a stone. And honestly, it’s not really clear to me that the government would care to see much higher interest costs on the debt. Only way Japan has survived its mountain of debt is that is it almost interest-free, after all.
  • But maybe the hawks will storm the Eccles Building and the Fed will not only raise rates, but also slow money growth (these were once tightly connected; now not so much, and it’s the money growth part that matters not the interest rate part). We can hope.
  • In a recent podcast, “How Many Swallows Make a Spring”, https://inflationguy.podbean.com/e/ep-12-how-many-swallows-make-a-spring/ I expressed my opinion that once the peak is in, the valley for inflation won’t be as low – because we have semi-permanently moved the distribution.
  • So we’re not looking, in late 2022, or in 2023, to get core inflation back to 2%. It’s just not going to happen unless housing collapses (which could happen – lots of weird things could happen – but we don’t base outlooks on what weird things COULD happen).
  • IMO, we’re now in a land of 3%-4% core, maybe if we’re lucky it’s 2.5%-3.5%. Getting it back to 1.5%-2.5% will take strong leadership (HA!) and a long time.
  • Recently, 10-year inflation breakevens reached 2.78% – matching the all-time highs (since TIPS were issued in 1997) from 2005. If you think about breakevens in the same way you think about TS…
  • So, as I wrote last month, you haven’t missed this trade yet. https://inflationguy.blog/2021/11/18/you-have-not-missed-it/
  • Thanks for tuning in. I’ll have the collated summary of these tweets up on my blog within a half hour or so, and will drop a podcast summary of it later. Retweet, call, click, visit, like, upvote, forward, or whatever the kids say these days.

The wonderful thing about December trading is that none of the market moves need to make sense. As I write this, stocks are up and inflation breakevens are down. It’s almost as if high inflation that didn’t actually surprise is somehow helping the ‘transitory’ story. Breakevens act as if the Fed is about to be aggressive and suck liquidity out of the system. But if that’s true, then it’s weird that stocks are higher because an elevated discount rate, with the stock market at record multiples, cannot be a good thing.

There is one way that those moves could be consistent, and that’s as if investors now believe that the inflation spike will indeed be transitory, and that the Fed won’t need to do anything after all. If it was all about some supply bottlenecks that will shortly resolve themselves, and the party can continue, then it would make sense to push inflation expectations lower and also not deflate stocks.

But to be clear, there is absolutely nothing in today’s number that would give any shape to that fantasy. For the third month in a row, the inflation figures were high and the price increases were spread across a very wide variety of categories. There is no one-off to point to. Used Cars adds something – but we haven’t yet seen the peak in that – and that rate of change will eventually ebb. At the same time, other categories are showing new life. This is a much more dangerous look than it was in the first half of 2021, when we expected broadening but it was still believable that “COVID categories” could be the main story. That story is dead and buried. This is not about the pandemic any longer; it is about policy response to the pandemic. It is almost entirely policy error. I will show again the picture from last month, which sums it up. Supply has done what supply usually does following a recession – if anything, it has recovered faster than usual and is back to trend. It’s demand that is far above normal, and that’s not an accident and it isn’t due to COVID. It is a policy error, and it will take many tears (and maybe many years) to reverse.

Summary of My Post-CPI Tweets (October 2021)

November 10, 2021 1 comment

Below is a summary of my post-CPI tweets. You can (and should!) follow me @inflation_guy. Or, sign up for email updates to my occasional articles here. Investors, issuers and risk managers with interests in this area be sure to stop by Enduring Investments! Get the Inflation Guy app in your app store! Check out the Inflation Guy podcast!

  • Hello #CPI Day. Is it my imagination or do these keep getting better? Today we should see a 31-year high in headline inflation and the second-highest Core #inflation in 30 years. And, honestly, there’s a chance we break June’s high on core.
  • It actually doesn’t matter much if we move to 30-year highs on core this month because it will certainly happen over the next few. We are entering the easy-comparison part of the year. Oct ’20 through Feb ’21 had a CUMULATIVE 0.42% on core CPI.
  • And it isn’t just core. Last month, the theme of broadening price pressures took a big step forward as MEDIAN CPI had the largest m/m jump since 1990.
  • A lot of that has to do with rents, which are starting now to catch up after the lifting of the eviction moratorium. As expected. There is a lot more to go on rents.
  • So the underlying themes this month are the same as they have been recently: broadening pressures and less attention on the one-off COVID categories…although…
  • There will be plenty of volatile noise – that’s not going away soon, and it will contribute to inflation expectations since people encode price volatility as increase. Food inflation will probably be the highest in a decade.
  • Wholesale gasoline has risen 10 months in a row. Hey, how long has Biden been President, roughly? I mean, counting his naps? (Sorry, that’s piling on and a 15-yard penalty.)
  • Used cars (and new cars) are also a risk this month. Last couple of months, used cars were a drag as the spike was fading. Not so much. Private surveys are spiking again. We probably see that this month, “a chunky amount”. Here is the Black Book survey.
  • And here is the change, vs the CPI for used cars, lagged. You never know about the lags though.
  • Now, policymakers are expressing the opinion that the very high inflation numbers we are seeing now will fade later in 2022. They’re right. There are some signs here and there that certain bottlenecks are easing.
  • The inflation noise is going to gradually lessen. Unfortunately that means we’re seeing more of the SIGNAL, which remains strong. Pressures OUTSIDE of the ‘reopening categories’ are broad. So core inflation will stay high (just not THIS high, probably) through 2022.
  • And as shortages get resolved, they’ll likely resolve at HIGHER prices, not lower. See my article “Shortages are Unmeasured Inflation.”
  • & the causal elements remain. The Fed is tapering but credit growth has been hot.The idea banks are being stingy w/ credit is either false, or they’re being replaced by non-banks. M2 growth is down to ~13%, but that’s still WAY too fast. Especially as velocity recovers.
  • Onto this month’s report: the Street is expecting a soft +0.4% on core, which would be the highest since June. I kinda think that’s the best case unless OER and Rents abruptly slow down again. Last month’s 0.24% on core only happened because the one-offs pulled it DOWN.
  • The interbank inflation derivatives market has y/y headline hitting 5.94% today, breaking to 6.5% next month, and staying over 6% until April. (Some of that is due to base effects in energy and core.)
  • I expect Rents to continue to move higher. Looking for that, & watching Median CPI. It’s at 2.42% y/y and will be higher this month; will be over 3% before very long. That’s where I think everything ends up settling out, late in 2022: 3.5%ish. Not as bad as now…but not good!
  • Good luck this morning. I will have a summary of all my tweets at https://mikeashton.wordpress.com sometime mid-morning and then I plan to put out an Inflation Guy podcast (https://inflationguy.podbean.com ) sometime today. And let me take a moment this month to say: Thank you Veterans.

  • Welp. Golly. 0.60% m/m on core CPI, putting the y/y up to 4.58%. A new 30-year high! And easy comparisons still to come…
  • So let’s see. Used cars +2.5% m/m, which we sort of expected. OER +0.44% m/m, and Primary Rents +0.42%, which we sort of expected.
  • Apparel? 0.00% m/m. Which means all the other 7 major subcategories contributed. Recreation +0.69%. Medical Care +0.50%. Housing +0.72%. Food/Bev 0.84%. Other +0.85%. Educ/Communication only +0.16%. Transportation +2.37%. Broad.
  • Airfares: -0.66% m/m. But lodging away from home +1.35%. If you consider used cars a covid category (I don’t), then covid still net adding to this number. But then, everything was.
  • New cars +1.36% m/m after +1.30% last month. Used car prices can’t be above new car prices for long – but one way to resolve that is new car prices up, not just used car prices down.
  • Car and truck rental +3.1% after -2.9%.
  • In Medical Care, “Medicinal Drugs” +0.59% m/m. It is still down y/y, but is this a sign up upward pressure in a category that has been soft for a while?
  • Doctors’ Services flat, but Hospital Services +0.45% m/m, up to 4.04% y/y. I wonder if laying off lots of unvaccinated nurses will lower prices for health care? Hmmm. Guessing no.
  • Overall Core Goods rose back up to 8.4%. But more disturbing is core Services jumping to 3.2%. Again, a lot of that is in rents.
  • Food prices y/y up at 5.33%.
  • Oh my. Oh my oh my. My first guess at median CPI is +0.57% m/m. That would EASILY be the highest since 1982 if I’m right.
  • The really scary thing is that I’m looking for a big outlier. And I can’t really find one.
  • Postage and delivery services were up +3.87% m/m. But that’s 0.11% of the CPI. Cigarettes +2.08%, but that’s 0.53% of the CPI. Health Insurance +1.99%, and that’s 1.2% of the CPI. Airline Fares, +3.5%, but 0.6% of the CPI.
  • The only category that declined more than 10% annualized was Jewelry and Watches (-26% annualized m/m). There were 19 that ROSE more than 10% annualized.
  • Core CPI ex-shelter back up to 5.35%. Sure, a lot of that is autos. But you kinda want that to go down especially when shelter itself…
  • OER is catching up to the model…but the model is running away from it too.
  • Here are the four-pieces. Piece 1, food and energy. Highest since just before the GFC.
  • Piece 2 – Core goods. Near the highest since 1981 (only the bump in June was higher).
  • Piece 3: Core services less rent of shelter. At last! Something that isn’t near 30-40 year highs. But these are the slower-moving pieces. Maybe it’s because they haven’t had time yet to adjust…
  • Piece 4. Rent of Shelter. The part everyone was hoping wouldn’t follow home prices and asking rents. Sorry about that. It’ll shortly be at 30-year highs too.
  • So this is starting to be less-subtle. Last month’s distribution of y/y changes vs this month (“OCT”). Left tail vanishing. Right tail growing. And whole middle shifting to the right. Not subtle. Not isolated.
  • Here is the weighting of components of CPI that is inflating faster than 4% y/y. Almost 40% of the entire basket.
  • 10y breakevens +5bps on the day to 2.69%. But that’s okay, Secretary Yellen tells us there’s no way that inflation expectations get unanchored.
  • I suppose it should be no surprise that the Enduring Investments Inflation Diffusion Index has reached an all-time high.
  • OK, let’s sum up. Different month, same story. There is still noise associated with “shutdown categories” and specific bottlenecks. But the underlying “signal” of inflation is getting stronger, as the pressures get broader. You can’t blame all of this on Long Beach.
  • Those pressures don’t come from the bottlenecks and shortages. They come from the fact that people can afford to pay higher prices because there’s more money in the system. Here is a chart of personal income vs GDP. Demand and supply. Where did the difference come from???
  • This ain’t rocket science. If you want the fire to stop, remove the oxygen. Oh, wait, actually that IS rocket science. Like, actual rocket science.
  • The Fed is finally slowing the rapid increase of its balance sheet. Be still my heart. Honestly, I don’t think they’ll even finish the taper, much less start to raise rates. Especially under Brainard. So buckle up. Lock in long-term contract prices.
  • I need to go take a shower. As much as the trajectory of inflation makes it fun to be “Inflation Guy,” this is monetary malpractice and it’s disgusting. This didn’t have to happen. Sorry. That probably shouldn’t be tweeted.
  • Anyway – the beatings will continue until morale improves!
  • Thanks for tuning in. There will be a tweet summary on https://mikeashton.wordpress.com  in a little while.And I’ll drop a podcast later today. Interested in the new strategy we’ve launched, or want to work with us to launch one for your clients? Go to https://enduringinvestments.com & contact us.

Seriously, this month’s report – while expected, at some level – turns my stomach. We have learned these lessons, painfully, long ago: you can’t spend in an out-of-control fashion and you can’t print the money that you’re spending. That’s fiscal policy 101 and monetary policy 101. Flunk them all, I say.

The good news is that we no longer need to argue about whether or not inflation is coming. It’s here. We don’t need to argue about whether inflation will broaden beyond the re-opening categories. It has. The only questions are: how much? For how long? And how do we stop it? The third question we already know the answer to: restrain money growth; even shrink the money supply if velocity continues to rebound. No, that’s not against the rules. But it is against current monetary orthodoxy, which regards no particularly interesting role for the quantity of money. Flunk them all, I say.

The answers to the first two questions, how much and for how long, depend on how long it takes for policymakers to change course. On the fiscal side, there seems to be growing resistance to the idea that you can spend any amount of money because you can always print a trillion-dollar coin. But there are still some who profess to believe that if you spend more, you can solve bottlenecks by improving infrastructure. Maybe, if this was about infrastructure. But it’s not. It about spending in an out-of-control fashion and printing the money that you’re spending. On the monetary side, our choices seem to be another ride with Chairman Powell – who is the one who brung us to this party and I don’t really want to dance with him – or Lael Brainard, who thinks Powell has been too hawkish.

Do you see the problem?

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